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Gender justice and women’s rights

Achieve gender justice to fight poverty

Gender inequality is a key driver of poverty

Let’s fight this injustice and improve the conditions of women in Indonesia

Extract | Every day, in Indonesia as in all countries of the world, women face discrimination and inequalities. They face violence, abuse and unequal treatment at home, at work, and in their communities at large - and are denied the opportunity to learn, win and lead. According to the 2018 Women’s Health and Life Experiences Survey, one in three women aged 15-64 years in Indonesia reported that she had experienced physical and/or sexual violence in her lifetime!

Every day, in Indonesia as in all countries of the world, women face discrimination and inequalities.

They face violence, abuse and unequal treatment at home, at work, and in their communities at large – and are denied the opportunity to learn, win and lead.

According to the 2018 Women’s Health and Life Experiences Survey, one in three women aged 15-64 years in Indonesia reported that she had experienced physical and/or sexual violence in her lifetime!

Women constitute the majority of those living in poverty. They have fewer resources, less power, and less influence than men, and may experience more inequalities due to their class, ethnicity, and age, as well as religious and other fundamentalism.

Gender inequality is a key driver of poverty. And a fundamental denial of women’s rights.

Achieve gender justice to fight poverty

Fair Future views gender justice as full equality and equity between women and men in all spheres of life, resulting in women, jointly and on an equal basis with men, define and shape the policies, structures, and decisions that affect their lives and society as a whole.

Further improvements in legislation and policy are necessary but not sufficient. We believe that transforming gender and power relations, and the structures, norms, and values ​​that underpin them are essential to ending poverty and address inequalities.

We believe that women who take control and take collective action are the most important drivers of lasting improvement in women’s rights and are a powerful force to end poverty not only for women and girls but also for others.

Putting women’s rights at the heart of everything we do

Whether we are responding to an emergency, working on long-term projects with communities, or campaigning for lasting change, we are addressing the deeply rooted inequalities and discrimination that make and keep women poor. We work closely with local women’s rights organizations as partners and allies to effectively address gender inequalities.

Supporting women’s access to resources

Fair Future support women in their fight to have equal opportunities to secure jobs and fair pay as men and have an equal chance to work their way out of poverty.

Raising women’s voices

Fair Future support women in their efforts to take part in decision-making at all levels and promote leadership and participation of women.

Ending violence against women and girls

Fair Future work with partners in Indonesia to stop violence against women by changing laws and challenging culturally accepted practices that treat women as second-class citizens.

Striving for gender equality in emergency response

Throughout all our humanitarian response work, we tailor our activities towards meeting the different needs of women and men in a way that promotes equality between them.

Gender inequality in numbers

1 in 3 |One in three women aged 15-64 years in Indonesia reported that she had experienced physical and/or sexual violence in her lifetime!

24% | Women make up less than 21% of the world’s parliamentarians and 5% of its mayors.

24% | On average, women are paid 24% less than men for comparable work, across all regions and sectors.

2/3 | Nearly two thirds of the world’s 781 million illiterate adults are women, a proportion that has remained unchanged for two decades.

153 |153 Countries have laws which discriminate against women economically, including 18 countries where husbands can legally prevent their wives from working.

Achieving gender justice is not just a matter of fundamental rights.

It is also an essential means of achieving more just societies and overcoming poverty. And we all have an equal role to play in making it happen.

  • We have seen the difference that equal employment opportunities, equal health care, and education, equal decision-making power, and the absence of violence can make.
  • We have seen the difference when women and girls are able to make their own choices and exercise their collective voice, and when institutions respond to their needs and interests.
Donate for a cause of your choice

Donate to programs initiated by Fair Future and be on the ground with us. We are committed to ensuring that as many people as possible have access to medical care (basic and emergency care), Covid-19 screening and testing, access to school and knowledge, drinking and clean water, sanitation, women's rights, and minorities living in rural and ultra peripheral areas.

Going where no one ever goes is one of our priorities, see Truck Of Life program.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for Clean Water Access in East Sumba

Do you want to participate in the drilling of a well for 40 families and 250 people? Provide clean and potable water to all those who no longer have access to it, or who have never had access to it. Water is life, water makes you feel good!

To do this, Fair Future and the Indonesian Red Cross are launching a program to build wells, toilets and provide access to drinking water to 42 villages and communities in East Sumba.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for healthcare, to improve health and save lives

Whether it is to fight against famine, diseases linked to the lack of clean water, the lack of sanitation system, the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, respiratory diseases linked to air pollution, tuberculosis, or any other form of recurrent illness, Fair Future does what it can to best help populations in need.

Help us to provide us with medicines, medical equipment, logistics, my indispensable faith also to get us where no one ever goes. Help us to heal, to give a better life, to help us to save lives!

**Click here to make a donation

COVID-19 in Indonesia, a dramatic situation

Take care of people, do what the state does not! Fair Futur acts to detect, test, treat and vaccinate the victims of the Pandemic. No Antigen tests, no vaccine (here in Sumba for example, hardly anyone is vaccinated). Also, the health centers are closed because they are infected and the medical staff is sick.

There are very few doctors and other medical personnel who are still at work. This is linked to medical and infectious factors, but also and above all because the staff is no longer paid, therefore they no longer come to work.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for East Indonesia disaster

After the Sumba natural disaster in April 2021, Fair Future is the only foreign organization there. We commit ourselves every day to rebuild, to improve...

We are confronted with health problems, social challenges. We need infrastructural and human resources. They need to eat, drink, have access to healthcare and a roof to protect themselves!

**Click here to make a donation

Action for Fair Future Plateforme

The Fair Future donation platform focuses on the fundraising needs of nonprofit organizations

More than yesterday and even less than tomorrow, Fair Future and Kawan Baik Foundations continue to develop projects with humanitarian, positive, and virtuous objectives.

Our organizations get involved every day, in a concrete way on the ground. They are men and women, mostly volunteers, who work to find solutions and implement them so that everyone can have a better life.

**Click here to make a donation

You don't have access to e-banking?

Sometimes, it is not possible to make a donation via modern solutions, by what is called "e-banking".

From then on, you can participate in one of our projects or programs by making a bank transfer, via one of our two bank accounts in Switzerland.

**Click here to make a donation

Some more Information

Water Connections Project – The Full Presentation

The .PDF presentation of the current project “Water Connections” – Drinking water for 200 families in MbinuDita. This document presents to you in detail the project that we started at the beginning of November, after months of preliminary studies. Once completed, the water connections will reach homes, families throughout the MbinuDita region. A magic trick carried out thanks to all of you, to all the friends of the Foundation. the “Kawan Baik” from here and elsewhere. No water, no life. No blue, no green.

Water Connections project – Today, we started drilling in MbinuDita

From the drilling site, here in East Sumba, MbinuDita village. A very rural and isolated region, in which nearly 220 families live, economically poor, without access to water, electricity, sanitation solutions (WC, shower), or medical care. A region where the lack of water is wreaking havoc in terms of health. Our are therefore able to provide them with what they need most. Clean water to live, to drink, to have good health, to prosper economically too. These few photos were taken during the last 15 days during our mission to prepare the village for the arrival of a source of clean water, via the drilling of a deep well – more than 60 meters -. This action is fully linked to the “Water Connections” program, initiated by Fair Future and Kawan Baik Indonesia foundations. A complicated project but which will come to fruition after two weeks of work on the spot, or about 15 days to drill, there … In the middle of nowhere, at the bottom of the hill that hosts our school in SD Mbinudita.

Medical assistance – Malaria in Indonesia, what we are doing?

Risk is present throughout the country, excluding urban areas, and excluding the areas specified: J akarta, Surabaya, Denpasar (Bali), and other large cities are risk-free, including the beach resorts in southern Bali. Sporadic cases of malaria in travelers have been reported from rural areas of Java, Bali (Padangbai area), Bintan, and Lombok islands. The WHO data does not take into account the situation in eastern Indonesia, which is linked to the lack of existing data. Nevertheless, malaria in the regions of Flores, Sumba Timur and Kupang is important in rural villages.

Rumah Kambera, the last few months on the site!

Rumah Kambera, some pictures taken during the last 6 weeks. A job 18 hours a day, 7 days a week in order to give the best of ourselves to all those who have great needs in the regions of eastern Indonesia. The foundation develops and implements actions in eastern Indonesia (NTT) and notably in East Sumba. To do so, we decided to coordinate our actions from what is now; “The Fair Future Base Camp” in the eastern regions of the country. In a village near Waingapu called Lambanapu. Rumah Kambera is its name. This -house- is a place of coordination of all our socio-medical, educational activities in favor of children, women, and communities in rural and peripheral regions where access to water, electricity, education, or healthcare is almost non-existent.

Dengue fever cases still on the rise despite seasonal change

The COVID-19 epidemic has not slowed the onset of seasonal dengue fever across the country. The country has been battling dengue fever since early this year, at a time when state resources have been spent on curbing the COVID-19 outbreak. The similarities between dengue fever and COVID-19 symptoms have also complicated efforts to mitigate the annual spike in cases. The island of Java has contributed the highest average number of dengue hemorrhagic fever cases each year. In recent years, Bali and Borneo (Kalimantan) have had the highest incidence.

Order the Fair Future Foundation T-Shirt now!

To support the actions of the foundation, you can help us in several ways. You can buy one of our t-shirts for example! The Fair Future team in the field uses this new 2021 t-shirt. Pure White and simple, it uses the colors of Switzerland, Indonesia, and of course, our official logo. The Red and the White: Association of two colors which represent Passion and Purity!

Impact of air pollution on health in Indonesia!

Outdoor air pollution is a mix of chemicals, particulate matter, and biological materials that react with each other to form tiny hazardous particles. It contributes to breathing problems, chronic diseases, increased hospitalization, and premature mortality. In Indonesia, this is the cause 50% of morbidity nationwide. How is air pollution affecting Indonesia? More than 80% of the Indonesian population of more than 260 million inhabitants, is exposed to annual average concentrations of pollution, well above the WHO guideline. The country has the fifth-highest loss of years of life in the world due to particulate matter pollution.

Assistance to people in case of malnutrition problems

Social consequences of malnutrition. Undernourished children have weaker immune systems and are thus more susceptible to infections and illnesses. Long-term insufficient nutrient intake and frequent infections can cause stunting, whose effects in terms of delayed motor and cognitive development are largely irreversible.

Medical Assistance for Children’s in pandemic time

Fair Future notes that children are certainly the most affected by the indirect impact of the pandemic than by the viral infection itself. Indeed, we have noticed that the COVID-19 pandemic is having an impact on the health of children, but through the increase in poverty, the loss of education and the closure of schools -here in Indonesia the closure of schools since March 2020-, food insecurity, violence as well as increased pressure on health systems and reduced access to personal health care services.

Rumah Kambera Base Camp – Covid-19 fight and Clean Water updates

Management of the pharmacy, water supply, Covid-19 program, infrastructures, and day-to-day organizations.
Facing the crisis linked to the pandemic, the lack of water and vital resources, managing the organizational structure in order to optimize the social and medical assistance that we offer. The 24 hours that a day counts are not enough to do everything!

Common diseases we work on

Life-saving tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

A social disease, tuberculosis affects more particularly the poorest groups of the population, in particular the homeless people in whom the incidence (approximately 200 / 100,000) far exceeds that of other groups.

In Indonesia, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in the category of infectious diseases. However, when one considers the general causes of death, tuberculosis ranks 3rd after heart disease and acute respiratory disease at all ages. The number of tuberculosis cases found in 2019 was around 645,000 cases. This figure has increased from the tuberculosis data recorded in 2018, which was in the order of 566.00 cases.

Meanwhile, the number of recorded deaths from tuberculosis based on WHO 2019 data is 98,000 people. This includes 5,300 deaths of tuberculosis patients with HIV / AIDS.

Life-saving anti-tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

In 2020, the 30 countries with a high TB burden accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two-thirds of the total, led by India, followed by Indonesia, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and South Africa.


More info: https://tbindonesia.or.id/pustaka-tbc/informasi/tentang-tbc/situasi-tbc-di-indonesia-2/

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

A social disease, tuberculosis affects more particularly the poorest groups of the population, in particular the homeless people in whom the incidence (approximately 200 / 100,000) far exceeds that of other groups.

In Indonesia, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in the category of infectious diseases. However, when one considers the general causes of death, tuberculosis ranks 3rd after heart disease and acute respiratory disease at all ages. The number of tuberculosis cases found in 2019 was around 645,000 cases. This figure has increased from the tuberculosis data recorded in 2018, which was in the order of 566.00 cases.

Meanwhile, the number of recorded deaths from tuberculosis based on WHO 2019 data is 98,000 people. This includes 5,300 deaths of tuberculosis patients with HIV / AIDS.

Life-saving anti-tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

In 2020, the 30 countries with a high TB burden accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two-thirds of the total, led by India, followed by Indonesia, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and South Africa.


More info: https://tbindonesia.or.id/pustaka-tbc/informasi/tentang-tbc/situasi-tbc-di-indonesia-2/

Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major cause of acute febrile illness in Indonesia.  And a high cause of death.

Dengue Fever

Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by dengue virus infection (IVD) which is transmitted through the bite of the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Dengue virus infection is an endemic disease that appears throughout the year, especially in the rainy season in various tropical and sub-tropical regions including in Indonesia. The rainy season is an optimal condition for breeding mosquitoes, so there can be an increase in cases that are high and fast. According to WHO, Indonesia is the second-largest country with dengue cases among 30 endemic regions.

Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children, and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and unplanned rapid urbanisation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is putting enormous pressure on the health and management systems of Dengue and tens of thousands of cases have not been managed properly, increasing mortality from this viral disease. Fair Future deals a lot with cases of Dengue, especially in poor villages, where no waste management is in place.

The case fatality rate (CFR) has been estimated at more than 20% of those infected. Knowing that Dengue fever affects millions of people every year, this makes it one of the most important causes of death in Indonesia. Complications can lead to circulatory system failure and shock, and can be fatal (also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome).

In some cases, Dengue infection is asymptomatic – persons do not exhibit symptoms. Those with symptoms get ill between 4 to 7 days after the bite. The infection is characterised by flu-like symptoms which include a sudden high fever coming in separate waves, pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint, and bone pain, severe headache, and a skin rash with red spots. Treatment includes supportive care of symptoms.

There is no antiviral treatment available. The illness may progress to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, bruising, and uncontrolled bleeding.

...

--> Read the dedicated page about Dengue Fever


More information: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/dengue-fever-cases-still-on-the-rise-despite-seasonal-change/

Dengue Fever

Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by dengue virus infection (IVD) which is transmitted through the bite of the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Dengue virus infection is an endemic disease that appears throughout the year, especially in the rainy season in various tropical and sub-tropical regions including in Indonesia. The rainy season is an optimal condition for breeding mosquitoes, so there can be an increase in cases that are high and fast. According to WHO, Indonesia is the second-largest country with dengue cases among 30 endemic regions.

Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children, and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and unplanned rapid urbanisation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is putting enormous pressure on the health and management systems of Dengue and tens of thousands of cases have not been managed properly, increasing mortality from this viral disease. Fair Future deals a lot with cases of Dengue, especially in poor villages, where no waste management is in place.

The case fatality rate (CFR) has been estimated at more than 20% of those infected. Knowing that Dengue fever affects millions of people every year, this makes it one of the most important causes of death in Indonesia. Complications can lead to circulatory system failure and shock, and can be fatal (also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome).

In some cases, Dengue infection is asymptomatic – persons do not exhibit symptoms. Those with symptoms get ill between 4 to 7 days after the bite. The infection is characterised by flu-like symptoms which include a sudden high fever coming in separate waves, pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint, and bone pain, severe headache, and a skin rash with red spots. Treatment includes supportive care of symptoms.

There is no antiviral treatment available. The illness may progress to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, bruising, and uncontrolled bleeding.

...

--> Read the dedicated page about Dengue Fever


More information: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/dengue-fever-cases-still-on-the-rise-despite-seasonal-change/

Each year, malaria kills thousands of people in Indonesia. 70% of all deaths are children under five years of age.

Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that spreads when an infected mosquito, bites a person. The mosquito transfers parasites into that person’s bloodstream. Symptoms of malaria include fever and shaking chills. Malaria is common in tropical countries such as Africa and Asia. Malaria is treatable if it’s caught early. The malaria trend in Indonesia is increasing dramatically in recent years. The disease is fairly easy to treat, but access to the most effective treatments remains insufficient. 

90% of all malaria deaths occur due to a lack of access to medical care. Mosquito nets are expensive and out of reach for many.

  • Malaria risk is present below the altitude of 2000 meters
  • High-risk months for Malaria are: January to December

The transmission of COVID-19 in Indonesia has continued unabated and has spread to malaria-endemic areas, in particular the eastern provinces of the country, such as East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) where Fair Future is working, Maluku, and Papua, forcing authorities to intensify their vigilance to avoid a double burden of disease.

According to data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health, an estimated 250,644 cases of malaria have occurred in Indonesia, 85% of which are in rural areas. The high level of malaria endemicity in some areas is a cause for concern, not least because there is no end in sight for the COVID-19 crisis. This figure should nevertheless be taken in the conditional because in a large number of regions of the country, people do not have an identity card or family record book, or people do not have access to medical care.

Plasmodium - a parasite that causes malaria in humans - can damage the immune system, which is why patients with malaria are prone to other infections, including COVID-19.

And there are no new drugs in the development pipeline, which means we may find ourselves without effective options in the future.

Read the full dedicated page here! It's really interesting.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-malaria-in-indonesia-what-we-are-doing/

Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that spreads when an infected mosquito, bites a person. The mosquito transfers parasites into that person’s bloodstream. Symptoms of malaria include fever and shaking chills. Malaria is common in tropical countries such as Africa and Asia. Malaria is treatable if it’s caught early. The malaria trend in Indonesia is increasing dramatically in recent years. The disease is fairly easy to treat, but access to the most effective treatments remains insufficient. 

90% of all malaria deaths occur due to a lack of access to medical care. Mosquito nets are expensive and out of reach for many.

  • Malaria risk is present below the altitude of 2000 meters
  • High-risk months for Malaria are: January to December

The transmission of COVID-19 in Indonesia has continued unabated and has spread to malaria-endemic areas, in particular the eastern provinces of the country, such as East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) where Fair Future is working, Maluku, and Papua, forcing authorities to intensify their vigilance to avoid a double burden of disease.

According to data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health, an estimated 250,644 cases of malaria have occurred in Indonesia, 85% of which are in rural areas. The high level of malaria endemicity in some areas is a cause for concern, not least because there is no end in sight for the COVID-19 crisis. This figure should nevertheless be taken in the conditional because in a large number of regions of the country, people do not have an identity card or family record book, or people do not have access to medical care.

Plasmodium - a parasite that causes malaria in humans - can damage the immune system, which is why patients with malaria are prone to other infections, including COVID-19.

And there are no new drugs in the development pipeline, which means we may find ourselves without effective options in the future.

Read the full dedicated page here! It's really interesting.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-malaria-in-indonesia-what-we-are-doing/

A real health emergency, resistance to antimicrobials. It threatens to make simple cuts & easily treatable diseases, are deadly again.

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial agents have played a vital role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases around the world. The WHO South-East Asia Region is no exception. On an Indonesian or "local" scale, antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, are very cheap, accessible, and very effective. It is with good reason that many have long considered them to be "miracle drugs".

The situation in Indonesia with this major health problem is absolutely catastrophic. Participating physicians prescribe antimicrobials on all counts, for infections for which any form of antimicrobial is unnecessary. Too large a proportion of sick patients simply no longer respond to the treatments they - sometimes very urgently - need.

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates “superbugs” that make treatment of basic infections difficult (and in some cases impossible) and surgery risky. And while the emergence of resistance in microorganisms is an ongoing phenomenon, its amplification and spread are the results of one thing: human behavior.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is particularly affected. As the risk assessments conducted by WHO have shown, the Region is probably the most at-risk part of the world. Not only does AMR affect the health and well-being of people in Indonesia, it also has ramifications for public health and general well-being. This makes the problem of immense global importance.

 


More info: https://www.balimedicaljournal.org/index.php/bmj/article/viewFile/1386/pdf

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial agents have played a vital role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases around the world. The WHO South-East Asia Region is no exception. On an Indonesian or "local" scale, antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, are very cheap, accessible, and very effective. It is with good reason that many have long considered them to be "miracle drugs".

The situation in Indonesia with this major health problem is absolutely catastrophic. Participating physicians prescribe antimicrobials on all counts, for infections for which any form of antimicrobial is unnecessary. Too large a proportion of sick patients simply no longer respond to the treatments they - sometimes very urgently - need.

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates “superbugs” that make treatment of basic infections difficult (and in some cases impossible) and surgery risky. And while the emergence of resistance in microorganisms is an ongoing phenomenon, its amplification and spread are the results of one thing: human behavior.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is particularly affected. As the risk assessments conducted by WHO have shown, the Region is probably the most at-risk part of the world. Not only does AMR affect the health and well-being of people in Indonesia, it also has ramifications for public health and general well-being. This makes the problem of immense global importance.

 


More info: https://www.balimedicaljournal.org/index.php/bmj/article/viewFile/1386/pdf

Plastic that burns, everywhere! Air pollution is responsible for almost 50% of mortality here.

Impact of air pollution on health

Globally, air pollution kills an estimated 7 million people annually in Indonesia according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Current air pollution problems are greatest in Indonesia as they caused 50% of morbidity across the country.

Diseases stemming from vehicular emissions and air pollution include acute respiratory infection, bronchial asthma, bronchitis, and eye, skin irritations, lung cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

In Indonesia plastic combustion is responsible for the majority of asthma cases in children. The culprits are "phthalates", those chemicals which give plastic its prized qualities (flexibility), and which are serious endocrine disruptors, associated with a plethora of health problems.

  • Burning plastics releases toxic gases such as dioxins, furans, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls into the atmosphere, and poses a threat to vegetation, as well as to the health of humans and animals;
  • When plastic is burned, it releases dangerous chemicals such as hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide, dioxins, furans, and heavy metals, as well as particulates. These emissions are known to cause respiratory ailments and stress human immune systems, and they're potentially carcinogenic;
  • Dioxins are deposited on crops, fruits, vegetables, and in waterways where they end up in our food and therefore in our bodies. These dioxins are potentially fatal persistent organic pollutants that can cause cancer and disrupt the respiratory and thyroid systems.
  • ...

Read the full page about this very serious matter

 


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/air-pollution-and-plastic-waste-in-indonesia/

Impact of air pollution on health

Globally, air pollution kills an estimated 7 million people annually in Indonesia according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Current air pollution problems are greatest in Indonesia as they caused 50% of morbidity across the country.

Diseases stemming from vehicular emissions and air pollution include acute respiratory infection, bronchial asthma, bronchitis, and eye, skin irritations, lung cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

In Indonesia plastic combustion is responsible for the majority of asthma cases in children. The culprits are "phthalates", those chemicals which give plastic its prized qualities (flexibility), and which are serious endocrine disruptors, associated with a plethora of health problems.

  • Burning plastics releases toxic gases such as dioxins, furans, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls into the atmosphere, and poses a threat to vegetation, as well as to the health of humans and animals;
  • When plastic is burned, it releases dangerous chemicals such as hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide, dioxins, furans, and heavy metals, as well as particulates. These emissions are known to cause respiratory ailments and stress human immune systems, and they're potentially carcinogenic;
  • Dioxins are deposited on crops, fruits, vegetables, and in waterways where they end up in our food and therefore in our bodies. These dioxins are potentially fatal persistent organic pollutants that can cause cancer and disrupt the respiratory and thyroid systems.
  • ...

Read the full page about this very serious matter

 


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/air-pollution-and-plastic-waste-in-indonesia/

An example of our work in women’s prisons in Indonesia