Select Page
Primary medical care program for kids in rural areas

Primary medical care program for kids in rural areas

The inhabitants of rural villages do not have access to primary care, and most medical centres are often several hours away on foot. The harshness of life here means we often get hurt, but nothing is available to treat ourselves—no doctor, knowledge, medical equipment and, of course, no antiseptic or medicine. These injuries can lead to the death of a child or an adult if they get worse. We must therefore act quickly. Fair Future, for years, has empowered schools and families in ultra-rural communities to take action in the event of an accident. Today, we are taking another step in this program.

Tuberculosis in Indonesia

Tuberculosis in Indonesia

The World Health Organization (WHO) has designated Indonesia as a “high-burden country” for tuberculosis. There are 22 high-burden countries worldwide, and they account for about 80% of TB infections. Indonesia has approximately 500,000 new tuberculosis cases each year and 175,000 attributable deaths.

Medical Assistance for Children

Medical Assistance for Children

Many children here still die from easily preventable problems, especially in their first days/weeks of life, and from diarrhoea and pneumonia. These are easily prevented and treated but are the biggest killers of children in the region. Too many mothers are in poor health or do not survive childbirth. In many areas where Fair Future works, more than 75 per cent of children are stunted, a condition associated with long-term undernutrition and poor sanitation and hygiene practices.

Medical assistance related to Malaria

Medical assistance related to Malaria

Malaria is one of the most severe public health problems in the world. The foundation is dealing with an upsurge in malaria cases as part of these community health actions. Here in Indonesia, and especially in the eastern regions, it is one of the leading causes of death and disease. Young children and pregnant women are the most affected groups. The problem in East Sumba is the staggering rate of cases affecting families and antimalarial drugs unavailable or too expensive.

Medical assistance related to Dengue Fever

Medical assistance related to Dengue Fever

The COVID-19 epidemic has not slowed the onset of seasonal dengue fever across the country. The country has been battling dengue fever since early this year, at a time when state resources have been spent on curbing the COVID-19 outbreak. The similarities between dengue fever and COVID-19 symptoms have also complicated efforts to mitigate the annual spike in cases. In a recent press statement, the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) said that while 51.2 percent of the country had entered the dry season, the rest of the archipelago was expected to experience prolonged rain for the next two to four months.

Undernutrition and impact on health

Undernutrition and impact on health

A disaster, eating here is a treat. The East Sumba region holds the record for the highest child malnutrition rate in the country and in Southeast Asia. Social consequences of malnutrition. Undernourished children have weaker immune systems and are thus more susceptible to infections and illnesses. Long-term insufficient nutrient intake and frequent infections can cause stunting, whose delayed motor and cognitive development effects are largely irreversible.