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Rebuild MbinuDita

Our new school in East Sumba, for hundreds of children aged 8 to 13, has been completed

The MbinuDita school project? No, it’s not just a simple school!

It is the center of life for several thousand people in this very rural region, located far from everything, where no real road leads!

Extract | On December 19, 2019, the old school collapsed. By rebuilding a new school, Fair Future ensured the continuity of educational activity in Mbinu Dita. Hundreds of children aged 8 to 13 now benefit from this beautiful school. The population of Mbinu Dita is far from any form of civilization, so this school is vital for the development of the region. And for the very rural community of this region, this school center is also a community center in which the foundation organizes social, medical, artistic, and cultural events throughout the year.

As you know, Fair Future and Kawan Baik work in the outermost and very rural areas of eastern Indonesia. MbinuDita? It is the story of an old school made of earth, pebbles, bamboo which, one day in December 2029, collapsed because of a storm!

The true story of the foundation’s collaborators who on that day cried, because no more school for this community, then meant that the children would no longer have access to any source of education, of knowledge … And for teachers, no more work! For the parents of these hundreds of children, it also meant a lot less chance of development and a less bright future for them!

Today, after building a new school, bigger, stronger, with materials resistant to storms, bad weather, earthquakes, Fair Future and Kawan Baik, as part of the program we named “rebuild MbinuDita “, continue to provide basic things for the lives of thousands of people there.

The program “Rebuild MbinuDita” is to give access to clean water to all the inhabitants of the community (water is extremely scarce here), but also to medical care, to healthy food by creations of organic gardens. These activities have no other objectives than to increase the quality of their life, to provide better health to people (especially children, vulnerable people, pregnant women), access to health and medical care, and for people to be able to increase their income.

What the foundation succeeded in doing, with the help of the people of the village, is absolutely out of the ordinary

You have to imagine or try to do it: Here, we are in the middle of nature. At the top of a hill where a very small path leads. It is there at the top that the old school was located! Without this old or new school, children would not have access to education. Or else, they would have to walk between 5 and 8 kilometers one way, to reach another school, through the hills, without shoes, without water… Impossible, not when you are between 8 and 13 years old!

We built a school there! By bringing materials from far away, from the town of Surabaya on the island of Java. By boat, by trucks too. Because here in Sumba, there are no similar building materials, solid, resistant. We built it in less than 5 months, in the midst of the pandemic. We were there every day, slept on the site or made them back and forth from Rumah Kambera, the Foundation’s Base Camp in eastern Indonesia. And we built it without electricity other than that provided by the generator in fact three, but two did not survive the harshness of the site!

Who are the children who come to MbinuDita’s school every day?

MbinuDita’s children? They have over a hundred coming to their new school every day. They still have to walk a little, but much less than if there was no school !. They are children from rural families, poor but rich in local cultures and traditions. This school offers them a chance to learn in good conditions, with quality teachers (also from the village and trained by the Foundation).

They are 8 to 12/13 years old. They marvel at nothing and play with a pebble, a piece of wood … They don’t speak much, are shy but we are there every day, so they know us well. And now we are part of their lives!

What are the programs and activities that take place in the MbinuDita school?

  • All school programs for the five different school levels;
  • Activities related to ecology, the creation of vegetable gardens among others;
  • Games and fun activities such as drawing, painting, chatting, teaching local cultures with the aim of preserving them;
  • The children also participate in the activities of the foundation, they help us without our having to ask them to do so. When, for example, we create a 6,000-liter tank that will be used to store rainwater;
  • In cleaning activities, manufacturing collective meals, etc…

Today? What do we still need from the “Rebuild MbinuDita” program?

  • Teachers need school supplies, books, notebooks, colored pencils, pens, water-based paints, large sheets of paper for painting and drawing, and anything that can be used to teach, to learn, and to develop in a fun way;
  • We also need you to help us keep the school in good condition, repaint from time to time because the climate here is harsh. Improve the solar electric system by adding solar panels too, repair a door that is broken;
  • We need medical equipment because the MbinuDiuta school is also the social and medical center of the region. Fair Future indeed organizes medical care, medical visits, distribution of vitamins or drugs specific to a disease as needed. In this, we still need funds in order to buy the necessary drugs to treat this population. These medical care activities are organized from the Foundation’s Base Camp in Rumah Kambera;
  • As part of the “Water Connections” program, which aims to ensure that villages have access to clean water sources, toilets, and adequate sanitation solutions, we need construction materials to drill wells, build water tanks, toilets, and even showers as we have been doing for a long time in eastern Indonesia;

We thank you very much for your kindness and your incredible participation in this project. This sum that Fair Future Foundation and Kawan Baik Indonesia were able to collect in order to build this school is something totally out of the ordinary, even magical.

We must now continue… School is not an end in itself, but a beginning!

The Location of SD MbinuDita in East Sumba

Start of the study: January 2020 | Start of works: August 2020 | End of Work: December 2020

The school collapsed and was 100% destroyed by a storm on December 19, 2020. The foundation reacted immediately and decided to rebuild it. But the COVID-19 pandemic has been there …

Technical planning, architectural plans, coordination, and ordering of materials began in January 2020, the start of construction in August 2020, and the end of work was celebrated in mid-December 2020.

Here the foundation has built a school of 3 classes, for levels 1, 2 and 3. That is to say children ages 8 to 10 years old.

This construction is the result of intense work and permanent involvement of the foundation on the ground. The success is there and now more than a hundred kids go there every day.

This new school is made to last over time, so that entire generations of children can learn here in MbinuDita … In the middle of nowhere, on the top of one of the highest hill of East Sumba.

Some more Information

Rumah Kambera, the last few months on site

Rumah Kambera, some pictures taken during the last 6 weeks. A job 18 hours a day, 7 days a week in order to give the best of ourselves to all those who have great needs in the regions of eastern Indonesia. The foundation develops and implements actions in eastern Indonesia (NTT) and notably in East Sumba. To do so, we decided to coordinate our actions from what is now; “The Fair Future Base Camp” in the eastern regions of the country. In a village near Waingapu called Lambanapu. Rumah Kambera is its name. This -house- is a place of coordination of all our socio-medical, educational activities in favor of children, women, and communities in rural and peripheral regions where access to water, electricity, education, or healthcare is almost non-existent.

Covid-19 fight – Free vaccination day for 500 registered people – 26.09.21.

Vaccination is still not accessible to everyone! Fair Future and Kawan Baik Indonesia, in collaboration with Denpasar City Youth Organization, Denpasar City Covid Task Force, Health Office, Social Service, and several medical personnel volunteers, have the opportunity to be able to carry out free vaccinations. This day of free vaccination will be held on September 26, 2021, at Rumah Sanur Creative Hub, Fair Future Foundation and Kawan Baik Indonesia foundations Base camp in Denpasar.

We allocate CHF. 10,000.- for the construction of a new Central Clean Water Access Point, in East Sumba

We are indeed pleased to announce the funding, for an amount of more than CHF 10,000.-, of a new Central Point of Access to Clean and Potable Water, as part of socio-medical actions in Rumah Kambera, eastern Indonesia. Access to water for families is essential for their lives, health, and well-being. In this sense, implementing sustainable solutions is one of our main goals with the Fair Future Foundation. In addition, this program is clearly part of the fight we are leading and engaging against the pandemic here in eastern Indonesia.

Tomorrow 31.08.21, a 3rd team will join forces already present in eastern indonesia

After having sent the 2nd team on-site last week, Fair Future will leave on August 31, 2021, in reinforcement to join the Base Camp of Rumah Kambera in Sumba East. A 3rd team made up of Kawan Ayu, Kawan Hasto and Kawan Alex. The mission is clearly defined in what we have been doing for months on the spot, namely: To fight as best as possible the devastation linked to the Covid-19 pandemic on the spot.

Pandemic in the South. We are happy to announce significant medical help!

Substantial aid in the form of a donation, for an amount of CHF 20’000.-, from the Swiss Foundation (but not from its government), was donated to Kawan Baik Indonesia in order to participate in the support of patients with COVID-19, in the regions of eastern Indonesia, particularly in Sumba. These funds, which will be invested in the field, where the real needs are, will be used to acquire oxygen therapy equipment, drugs, food, antigen, and PCR tests.

Swiss Gov donates to the Indonesian Gov! And us?

Glad to see that Switzerland sent medical material to Indonesia!! But as Swiss Official Organisation, we are sorry to say that we have no illusions that how this vital material will be distributed, used! For sure, in Jakarta, the modern cities of java, and the people in the big hospitals. Some will be sold probably also, as COVID-19 here is also a matter of business! And unfortunately, nothing will be issued! Here, in the ultra-peripheral and rural regions of eastern Indonesia, where the Fair Future Foundation and its teams are currently located… Why did the Swiss Government give to a corrupt country? And not an honest Swiss Legal NGO?

COVID-19 Situation & Action Program in NTT – We act strongly!

The situation in eastern Indonesia, the lack of state response, in order to deal with the severity of the pandemic here. Fair Future and Kawan Baik are asking for aid from States, banks, the International Monetary Fund in order to detect, test, vaccinate, take care of families, sick people – But also to put in place preventive actions, massive tests, and solutions for infected people. In any case, we cannot sit idly by.

Project evaluation. Clean water access point in Mauliru village, Sumba

After more than three weeks on-site with the Truck of Life, Fair Future is on the site of the 1st Access Point to clean water and toilets. The work today is coming to an end and in a few days, it is over 250 people going to provide toilets, clean water and showers. Access to clean water and toilets. What is it like to go to the bathroom here and elsewhere?

Construction process of the first Central Water Points

Carrying out such projects seem trivial. Water is a matter that we generally popularise. And yet, here in rural areas of eastern Indonesia, it is a real challenge. Therefore, here is a document that presents the process of building the first Central Water Points, which Fair Future is building, for the benefit of the hundreds of families in East Sumba.

Water access, project study in Mauliru, Sumba East

From Sumba where we are now, we study and analyze the needs of people, in terms of access to clean water. We act daily to offer solutions aimed at ensuring that as many people as possible have access to clean water that is not dangerous to health, especially that of children.

Number of beneficiaries

About 15,000 inhabitants. Children of the region, families to develop eco-friendly activities for a better life.

Total amount of this Project

CHF.49’813.-

Funded by Fair Future

CHF. 41’836.-

Final Report

See this News here

Common diseases we work on

Life-saving tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

A social disease, tuberculosis affects more particularly the poorest groups of the population, in particular the homeless people in whom the incidence (approximately 200 / 100,000) far exceeds that of other groups.

In Indonesia, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in the category of infectious diseases. However, when one considers the general causes of death, tuberculosis ranks 3rd after heart disease and acute respiratory disease at all ages. The number of tuberculosis cases found in 2019 was around 645,000 cases. This figure has increased from the tuberculosis data recorded in 2018, which was in the order of 566.00 cases.

Meanwhile, the number of recorded deaths from tuberculosis based on WHO 2019 data is 98,000 people. This includes 5,300 deaths of tuberculosis patients with HIV / AIDS.

Life-saving anti-tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

In 2020, the 30 countries with a high TB burden accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two-thirds of the total, led by India, followed by Indonesia, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and South Africa.


More info: https://tbindonesia.or.id/pustaka-tbc/informasi/tentang-tbc/situasi-tbc-di-indonesia-2/

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

A social disease, tuberculosis affects more particularly the poorest groups of the population, in particular the homeless people in whom the incidence (approximately 200 / 100,000) far exceeds that of other groups.

In Indonesia, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in the category of infectious diseases. However, when one considers the general causes of death, tuberculosis ranks 3rd after heart disease and acute respiratory disease at all ages. The number of tuberculosis cases found in 2019 was around 645,000 cases. This figure has increased from the tuberculosis data recorded in 2018, which was in the order of 566.00 cases.

Meanwhile, the number of recorded deaths from tuberculosis based on WHO 2019 data is 98,000 people. This includes 5,300 deaths of tuberculosis patients with HIV / AIDS.

Life-saving anti-tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

In 2020, the 30 countries with a high TB burden accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two-thirds of the total, led by India, followed by Indonesia, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and South Africa.


More info: https://tbindonesia.or.id/pustaka-tbc/informasi/tentang-tbc/situasi-tbc-di-indonesia-2/

Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major cause of acute febrile illness in Indonesia.  And a high cause of death.

Dengue Fever

Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by dengue virus infection (IVD) which is transmitted through the bite of the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Dengue virus infection is an endemic disease that appears throughout the year, especially in the rainy season in various tropical and sub-tropical regions including in Indonesia. The rainy season is an optimal condition for breeding mosquitoes, so there can be an increase in cases that are high and fast. According to WHO, Indonesia is the second-largest country with dengue cases among 30 endemic regions.

Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children, and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and unplanned rapid urbanisation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is putting enormous pressure on the health and management systems of Dengue and tens of thousands of cases have not been managed properly, increasing mortality from this viral disease. Fair Future deals a lot with cases of Dengue, especially in poor villages, where no waste management is in place.

The case fatality rate (CFR) has been estimated at more than 20% of those infected. Knowing that Dengue fever affects millions of people every year, this makes it one of the most important causes of death in Indonesia. Complications can lead to circulatory system failure and shock, and can be fatal (also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome).

In some cases, Dengue infection is asymptomatic – persons do not exhibit symptoms. Those with symptoms get ill between 4 to 7 days after the bite. The infection is characterised by flu-like symptoms which include a sudden high fever coming in separate waves, pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint, and bone pain, severe headache, and a skin rash with red spots. Treatment includes supportive care of symptoms.

There is no antiviral treatment available. The illness may progress to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, bruising, and uncontrolled bleeding.

...

--> Read the dedicated page about Dengue Fever


More information: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/dengue-fever-cases-still-on-the-rise-despite-seasonal-change/

Dengue Fever

Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by dengue virus infection (IVD) which is transmitted through the bite of the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Dengue virus infection is an endemic disease that appears throughout the year, especially in the rainy season in various tropical and sub-tropical regions including in Indonesia. The rainy season is an optimal condition for breeding mosquitoes, so there can be an increase in cases that are high and fast. According to WHO, Indonesia is the second-largest country with dengue cases among 30 endemic regions.

Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children, and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and unplanned rapid urbanisation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is putting enormous pressure on the health and management systems of Dengue and tens of thousands of cases have not been managed properly, increasing mortality from this viral disease. Fair Future deals a lot with cases of Dengue, especially in poor villages, where no waste management is in place.

The case fatality rate (CFR) has been estimated at more than 20% of those infected. Knowing that Dengue fever affects millions of people every year, this makes it one of the most important causes of death in Indonesia. Complications can lead to circulatory system failure and shock, and can be fatal (also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome).

In some cases, Dengue infection is asymptomatic – persons do not exhibit symptoms. Those with symptoms get ill between 4 to 7 days after the bite. The infection is characterised by flu-like symptoms which include a sudden high fever coming in separate waves, pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint, and bone pain, severe headache, and a skin rash with red spots. Treatment includes supportive care of symptoms.

There is no antiviral treatment available. The illness may progress to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, bruising, and uncontrolled bleeding.

...

--> Read the dedicated page about Dengue Fever


More information: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/dengue-fever-cases-still-on-the-rise-despite-seasonal-change/

Each year, malaria kills thousands of people in Indonesia. 70% of all deaths are children under five years of age.

Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that spreads when an infected mosquito, bites a person. The mosquito transfers parasites into that person’s bloodstream. Symptoms of malaria include fever and shaking chills. Malaria is common in tropical countries such as Africa and Asia. Malaria is treatable if it’s caught early. The malaria trend in Indonesia is increasing dramatically in recent years. The disease is fairly easy to treat, but access to the most effective treatments remains insufficient. 

90% of all malaria deaths occur due to a lack of access to medical care. Mosquito nets are expensive and out of reach for many.

  • Malaria risk is present below the altitude of 2000 meters
  • High-risk months for Malaria are: January to December

The transmission of COVID-19 in Indonesia has continued unabated and has spread to malaria-endemic areas, in particular the eastern provinces of the country, such as East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) where Fair Future is working, Maluku, and Papua, forcing authorities to intensify their vigilance to avoid a double burden of disease.

According to data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health, an estimated 250,644 cases of malaria have occurred in Indonesia, 85% of which are in rural areas. The high level of malaria endemicity in some areas is a cause for concern, not least because there is no end in sight for the COVID-19 crisis. This figure should nevertheless be taken in the conditional because in a large number of regions of the country, people do not have an identity card or family record book, or people do not have access to medical care.

Plasmodium - a parasite that causes malaria in humans - can damage the immune system, which is why patients with malaria are prone to other infections, including COVID-19.

And there are no new drugs in the development pipeline, which means we may find ourselves without effective options in the future.

Read the full dedicated page here! It's really interesting.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-malaria-in-indonesia-what-we-are-doing/

Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that spreads when an infected mosquito, bites a person. The mosquito transfers parasites into that person’s bloodstream. Symptoms of malaria include fever and shaking chills. Malaria is common in tropical countries such as Africa and Asia. Malaria is treatable if it’s caught early. The malaria trend in Indonesia is increasing dramatically in recent years. The disease is fairly easy to treat, but access to the most effective treatments remains insufficient. 

90% of all malaria deaths occur due to a lack of access to medical care. Mosquito nets are expensive and out of reach for many.

  • Malaria risk is present below the altitude of 2000 meters
  • High-risk months for Malaria are: January to December

The transmission of COVID-19 in Indonesia has continued unabated and has spread to malaria-endemic areas, in particular the eastern provinces of the country, such as East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) where Fair Future is working, Maluku, and Papua, forcing authorities to intensify their vigilance to avoid a double burden of disease.

According to data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health, an estimated 250,644 cases of malaria have occurred in Indonesia, 85% of which are in rural areas. The high level of malaria endemicity in some areas is a cause for concern, not least because there is no end in sight for the COVID-19 crisis. This figure should nevertheless be taken in the conditional because in a large number of regions of the country, people do not have an identity card or family record book, or people do not have access to medical care.

Plasmodium - a parasite that causes malaria in humans - can damage the immune system, which is why patients with malaria are prone to other infections, including COVID-19.

And there are no new drugs in the development pipeline, which means we may find ourselves without effective options in the future.

Read the full dedicated page here! It's really interesting.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-malaria-in-indonesia-what-we-are-doing/

A real health emergency, resistance to antimicrobials. It threatens to make simple cuts & easily treatable diseases, are deadly again.

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial agents have played a vital role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases around the world. The WHO South-East Asia Region is no exception. On an Indonesian or "local" scale, antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, are very cheap, accessible, and very effective. It is with good reason that many have long considered them to be "miracle drugs".

The situation in Indonesia with this major health problem is absolutely catastrophic. Participating physicians prescribe antimicrobials on all counts, for infections for which any form of antimicrobial is unnecessary. Too large a proportion of sick patients simply no longer respond to the treatments they - sometimes very urgently - need.

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates “superbugs” that make treatment of basic infections difficult (and in some cases impossible) and surgery risky. And while the emergence of resistance in microorganisms is an ongoing phenomenon, its amplification and spread are the results of one thing: human behavior.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is particularly affected. As the risk assessments conducted by WHO have shown, the Region is probably the most at-risk part of the world. Not only does AMR affect the health and well-being of people in Indonesia, it also has ramifications for public health and general well-being. This makes the problem of immense global importance.

 


More info: https://www.balimedicaljournal.org/index.php/bmj/article/viewFile/1386/pdf

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial agents have played a vital role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases around the world. The WHO South-East Asia Region is no exception. On an Indonesian or "local" scale, antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, are very cheap, accessible, and very effective. It is with good reason that many have long considered them to be "miracle drugs".

The situation in Indonesia with this major health problem is absolutely catastrophic. Participating physicians prescribe antimicrobials on all counts, for infections for which any form of antimicrobial is unnecessary. Too large a proportion of sick patients simply no longer respond to the treatments they - sometimes very urgently - need.

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates “superbugs” that make treatment of basic infections difficult (and in some cases impossible) and surgery risky. And while the emergence of resistance in microorganisms is an ongoing phenomenon, its amplification and spread are the results of one thing: human behavior.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is particularly affected. As the risk assessments conducted by WHO have shown, the Region is probably the most at-risk part of the world. Not only does AMR affect the health and well-being of people in Indonesia, it also has ramifications for public health and general well-being. This makes the problem of immense global importance.

 


More info: https://www.balimedicaljournal.org/index.php/bmj/article/viewFile/1386/pdf

Plastic that burns, everywhere! Air pollution is responsible for almost 50% of mortality here.

Impact of air pollution on health

Globally, air pollution kills an estimated 7 million people annually in Indonesia according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Current air pollution problems are greatest in Indonesia as they caused 50% of morbidity across the country.

Diseases stemming from vehicular emissions and air pollution include acute respiratory infection, bronchial asthma, bronchitis, and eye, skin irritations, lung cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

In Indonesia plastic combustion is responsible for the majority of asthma cases in children. The culprits are "phthalates", those chemicals which give plastic its prized qualities (flexibility), and which are serious endocrine disruptors, associated with a plethora of health problems.

  • Burning plastics releases toxic gases such as dioxins, furans, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls into the atmosphere, and poses a threat to vegetation, as well as to the health of humans and animals;
  • When plastic is burned, it releases dangerous chemicals such as hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide, dioxins, furans, and heavy metals, as well as particulates. These emissions are known to cause respiratory ailments and stress human immune systems, and they're potentially carcinogenic;
  • Dioxins are deposited on crops, fruits, vegetables, and in waterways where they end up in our food and therefore in our bodies. These dioxins are potentially fatal persistent organic pollutants that can cause cancer and disrupt the respiratory and thyroid systems.
  • ...

Read the full page about this very serious matter

 


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/air-pollution-and-plastic-waste-in-indonesia/

Impact of air pollution on health

Globally, air pollution kills an estimated 7 million people annually in Indonesia according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Current air pollution problems are greatest in Indonesia as they caused 50% of morbidity across the country.

Diseases stemming from vehicular emissions and air pollution include acute respiratory infection, bronchial asthma, bronchitis, and eye, skin irritations, lung cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

In Indonesia plastic combustion is responsible for the majority of asthma cases in children. The culprits are "phthalates", those chemicals which give plastic its prized qualities (flexibility), and which are serious endocrine disruptors, associated with a plethora of health problems.

  • Burning plastics releases toxic gases such as dioxins, furans, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls into the atmosphere, and poses a threat to vegetation, as well as to the health of humans and animals;
  • When plastic is burned, it releases dangerous chemicals such as hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide, dioxins, furans, and heavy metals, as well as particulates. These emissions are known to cause respiratory ailments and stress human immune systems, and they're potentially carcinogenic;
  • Dioxins are deposited on crops, fruits, vegetables, and in waterways where they end up in our food and therefore in our bodies. These dioxins are potentially fatal persistent organic pollutants that can cause cancer and disrupt the respiratory and thyroid systems.
  • ...

Read the full page about this very serious matter

 


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/air-pollution-and-plastic-waste-in-indonesia/
This page link: Rebuild MbinuDita

SOME PICTURES OF THE STORY of “REBUILD MBINUDITA”

What the foundation succeeded in doing, with the help of the people of the village, is absolutely out of the ordinary