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Water and Sanitation

Fair Future Foundation believes that is one of the main key for a better life

Indonesia’s water and sanitation crisis Water and Sanitation

Together, we can prevent disease and sustains lives and livelihoods

Extract | When waters run dry, people can't get enough to drink, wash, or feed crops, and economic decline may occur. In addition, inadequate sanitation—a problem for 2.4 billion people—can lead to deadly diarrheal diseases, including cholera and typhoid fever, and other water-borne illnesses.

Our job is to ensure equitable access to water in quantity and quality, which prevents disease and sustains lives and livelihoods; reduce environmental health risks by managing sanitation safely and with dignity; and involving women and men in water and sanitation resource management and safe hygiene practices to maximise benefits for their communities.

Fair Future, for the “Water Connections Program”, builds central water points. The foundation finances (and builds) each of these constructions between $ 7,500.- and $ 10,000.-.

Fair Future is also and above all on-site, every day, as part of the phase of “recovery and reconstruction, in Sumba East. Each project provides water and sanitation facilities to 40+ families or nearly 300 people. But also and of course, clean water, showers, toilets.

Without water, there will be no plants, no trees, no fruits & vegetables, and ultimately, no food. This project aims to drill a well to a depth of nearly 50m in order to have clean and consumable water, but also to add toilets, a place to wash and organise activities around the theme of water… and ultimately, be able to eat, heal, stay healthy, drink… Live!

It’s too easy to forget what miracle water is. In wealthy countries, clean, safe drinking water is so abundant and readily available that we just take it for granted. Access to drinking water is a fundamental human right.

Yet billions of poor people around the world still face the daily challenge of accessing safe water sources, spending countless hours in line, or traveling long distances and coping with the effects. on the health of the use of contaminated water.

Millions of people fall ill or die every day because they are forced to do without these most basic services. Diseases from unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation kill more people each year than all forms of violence, including war, making it one of the world’s most pressing health problems.

Situation in Indonesia

With a population of 264 million people, Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world and claims Southeast Asia’s largest economy. The capital, Jakarta, continues to expand as an international hub; however, rural communities and residents of informal settlements in urban areas struggle in terms of poor health and infrastructure. For many households, water sources are distant, contaminated or expensive, and household sanitation is unaffordable.

Nearly 28 million Indonesians lack safe water and 71 million lack access to improved sanitation facilities. Fortunately, there is a growing microfinance sector serving low-income households across the country, and they are recognising that financing for water supply and sanitation is a growing need.

In Indonesia and around the world, people are navigating the COVID-19 pandemic, and millions are striving to endure this crisis with an added challenge. They lack access to life’s most critical resource – water. Now more than ever access to safe water is critical to the health of families in Indonesia.

Water is a matter of concern to us at the Fair Future Foundation

Our humanitarian responses, our campaigns, and our long-term initiatives to help families improve their incomes, reduce their vulnerability to disasters, and defend their rights.

Our job is to ensure equitable access to water in quantity and quality, which prevents disease and sustains lives and livelihoods; reduce environmental health risks by managing sanitation safely and with dignity; and involving women and men in water and sanitation resource management and safe hygiene practices to maximise benefits for their communities.

Billions of people will lack access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene in 2030 unless progress

Even before the pandemic, millions of children and families suffered without clean water, sanitation, and a place to wash their hands.

Despite our impressive progress, alarming and growing needs continue to exceed our ability to meet. Fair Future is dramatically accelerating its efforts to provide children and families with the most basic needs for their health and well-being, including the fight against infectious diseases like COVID-19.

Limit of water filters

Filtering water is a process designed to make water as drinkable as possible. Unfortunately, this does not always work and this solution is not suitable for populations who have very limited access to a water source, or even no water at all.

In many villages and regions in which we operate, three factors must be remembered above all else:

1. Local knowledge: If people have access to a source of water, then setting up single filters per house is possible. Nevertheless, we will come up against the knowledge of people in terms of long-term use. I would also say in terms of interests and priorities. Cleaning, maintenance, filter change after a number of liters X, or months! It is sometimes difficult to explain simple things, therefore the notion of time, days, hours, temperature, quantity, pollution, dirt, harm to health for example, are very little understood concepts. and which once explained will have little chance of being retained and applied. I am talking about the communities of the outermost, rural, agrarian regions which operate slowly, to the rhythm of sunrise and sunset. They have the ones with the least access to water.

2. Access to water: Many villages simply do not have access to water. It is therefore impossible to filter water when you do not have it! So how do they drink? Many villages have recourse to social services, which deliver water tankers, stored in large reservoirs that, for example, Fair Future builds or installs. This water is clean and does not need to be filtered.
Also, the water filter is a partial solution in the sense that it does not allow washing, showering, cooking (or else, you need very large filters). Skin problems and related diseases also have a source related to the quality of the water ...

3. The economic aspect: A filter not only needs to be washed, maintained ... but above all to be changed! It is expensive for these families and above all, almost inaccessible if no NGO has it. It is difficult for them to eat anything other than white rice with chili and salt to give it a little taste. Impossible to treat oneself apart from solutions offered by NGOs such as Fair Future or Kawan Baik Foundations on-site ...
So buy a filter ... Go to town when you can't afford to go ...

Unfortunately, this is an observation that we have made for a long time. The simple water filtration system only works for those who have dirty water (inepsia), enough to be able to maintain this filter in good condition both financially and comprehensively.

This is why with Fair Future, we have chosen to provide means aimed at providing clean water in quantity and quality to these communities, by means of sustainable, inexpensive solutions: Drilling of wells, distribution in the villages. and or houses by incorporating sanitation solutions such as WC by gender, showers, washing point for clothes.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-for-the-undernourished
COVID-19 in Indonesia, a dramatic situation

Take care of people, do what the state does not! Fair Futur acts to detect, test, treat and vaccinate the victims of the Pandemic. No Antigen tests, no vaccine (here in Sumba for example, hardly anyone is vaccinated). Also, the health centers are closed because they are infected and the medical staff is sick.

There are very few doctors and other medical personnel who are still at work. This is linked to medical and infectious factors, but also and above all because the staff is no longer paid, therefore they no longer come to work.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for East Indonesia disaster

After the Sumba natural disaster in April 2021, Fair Future is the only foreign organization there. We commit ourselves every day to rebuild, to improve...

We are confronted with health problems, social challenges. We need infrastructural and human resources. They need to eat, drink, have access to healthcare and a roof to protect themselves!

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for Clean Water Access in East Sumba

Do you want to participate in the drilling of a well for 40 families and 250 people? Provide clean and potable water to all those who no longer have access to it, or who have never had access to it. Water is life, water makes you feel good!

To do this, Fair Future and the Indonesian Red Cross are launching a program to build wells, toilets and provide access to drinking water to 42 villages and communities in East Sumba.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for a cause of your choice

Donate to programs initiated by Fair Future and be on the ground with us. We are committed to ensuring that as many people as possible have access to medical care (basic and emergency care), Covid-19 screening and testing, access to school and knowledge, drinking and clean water, sanitation, women's rights, and minorities living in rural and ultra peripheral areas.

Going where no one ever goes is one of our priorities, see Truck Of Life program.

**Click here to make a donation

You don't have access to e-banking?

Sometimes, it is not possible to make a donation via modern solutions, by what is called "e-banking".

From then on, you can participate in one of our projects or programs by making a bank transfer, via one of our two bank accounts in Switzerland.

**Click here to make a donation

Action for Fair Future Plateforme

The Fair Future donation platform focuses on the fundraising needs of nonprofit organizations

More than yesterday and even less than tomorrow, Fair Future and Kawan Baik Foundations continue to develop projects with humanitarian, positive, and virtuous objectives.

Our organizations get involved every day, in a concrete way on the ground. They are men and women, mostly volunteers, who work to find solutions and implement them so that everyone can have a better life.

**Click here to make a donation

Water for 42 villages – This project started in June 2020, it will last two years!

A little reminder on this project and this action: Initiated by Kawan Baik and Fair Future Foundations in collaboration with the Indonesian Red Cross, we must duplicate this project by 40, that is to say for 42 villages. This project aims to provide clean, potable and sufficient water to nearly 10,000 people.

Building a unique project like this (Read the .PDF here) costs CHF. 9.800.- All inclusive, including pumps, filters, building construction, local labor and all related costs.

To have water in order to save lives because infant mortality is very high here due to various infections … Wash, shower, drink, cook! And also so that pregnant women can get through their pregnancies! And bring their child into the world.

Limit of water filters

Filtering water is a process designed to make water as drinkable as possible. Unfortunately, this does not always work and this solution is not suitable for populations who have very limited access to a water source, or even no water at all.

In many villages and regions in which we operate, three factors must be remembered above all else:

1. Local knowledge: If people have access to a source of water, then setting up single filters per house is possible. Nevertheless, we will come up against the knowledge of people in terms of long-term use. I would also say in terms of interests and priorities. Cleaning, maintenance, filter change after a number of liters X, or months! It is sometimes difficult to explain simple things, therefore the notion of time, days, hours, temperature, quantity, pollution, dirt, harm to health for example, are very little understood concepts. and which once explained will have little chance of being retained and applied. I am talking about the communities of the outermost, rural, agrarian regions which operate slowly, to the rhythm of sunrise and sunset. They have the ones with the least access to water.

2. Access to water: Many villages simply do not have access to water. It is therefore impossible to filter water when you do not have it! So how do they drink? Many villages have recourse to social services, which deliver water tankers, stored in large reservoirs that, for example, Fair Future builds or installs. This water is clean and does not need to be filtered.
Also, the water filter is a partial solution in the sense that it does not allow washing, showering, cooking (or else, you need very large filters). Skin problems and related diseases also have a source related to the quality of the water ...

3. The economic aspect: A filter not only needs to be washed, maintained ... but above all to be changed! It is expensive for these families and above all, almost inaccessible if no NGO has it. It is difficult for them to eat anything other than white rice with chili and salt to give it a little taste. Impossible to treat oneself apart from solutions offered by NGOs such as Fair Future or Kawan Baik Foundations on-site ...
So buy a filter ... Go to town when you can't afford to go ...

Unfortunately, this is an observation that we have made for a long time. The simple water filtration system only works for those who have dirty water (inepsia), enough to be able to maintain this filter in good condition both financially and comprehensively.

This is why with Fair Future, we have chosen to provide means aimed at providing clean water in quantity and quality to these communities, by means of sustainable, inexpensive solutions: Drilling of wells, distribution in the villages. and or houses by incorporating sanitation solutions such as WC by gender, showers, washing point for clothes.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-for-the-undernourished

What we do now, today!

Fair Future ensures equitable access to water in quantity and quality, which prevents disease and sustains lives and livelihoods; reduce environmental health risks by managing sanitation safely and with dignity; and involving women and men in water and sanitation resource management and safe hygiene practices to maximize benefits for their communities.

The costs of unsafe water in the world!

  • 2.2 billion people do not have access to drinking water at home.
  • 2.3 billion people do not have access to basic sanitation services, such as toilets or latrines.
  • Worldwide, over 80% of all wastewater returns to the environment untreated.
  • Every day, more than 800 children under the age of five die from diarrhea caused by dirty water.
  • 700 million people around the world could be displaced by severe water scarcity by 2030.
This page link: Water and Sanitation

INDONESIA

POPULATION 268.2 MILLION

28 MILLION

LACK ACCESS TO SAFE WATER

71 MILLION

PEOPLE LACK ACCESS TO SANITATION

Water to live, to eat, to grow healthily

Clean water is essential for staying healthy;
Clean water is essential to heal, grow, eat, drink, wash;
Be able to eat, heal, stay healthy, drink, cook… live!

Water after the disaster

To meet the extremely urgent needs for drinking water and sanitation for communities and families affected by the disaster;
Meet the needs of every living being, that of having access to clean water.

Water to maintain personal hygiene

Have adequate public toilets so that families and communities can readjust to a healthier lifestyle;
Improve the quality of life with good sanitation for the communities.

Water is like a miracle for some people!

Look what we are doing in terms of Clan Water access