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Medical Assistance for Children’s

The children? These are always the first victims!

What we do: Medical Assistance for Children’s

In Indonesia, children are the most vulnerable group, with the highest risk of disease and mortality

Extract | The principal causes of ill-health and mortality among children in developing countries are outlined and the prospects for improvement through the provision of education, health services, adequate nutrition, clean drinking-water, sanitation and other basic needs.

Child Health

Clean water and good sanitation are essential to prevent and reduce child mortality. Women who become pregnant at either extreme of childbearing age are at higher maternal and pediatric risks; the same goes for multiparous women and women with short birth intervals. Most deaths of children aged 1 to 4 are preventable by simple health intervention: The main causes are diarrheic and respiratory diseases, malnutrition, and vaccine-preventable infectious diseases.

Fair Future notes that children are certainly the most affected by the indirect impact of the pandemic than by the viral infection itself. Indeed, we have noticed that the COVID-19 pandemic is having an impact on the health of children, but through the increase in poverty, the loss of education and the closure of schools -here in Indonesia the closure of schools since March 2020-, food insecurity, violence as well as increased pressure on health systems and reduced access to personal health care services.

While children with chronic conditions -such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma, and epilepsy- do not constitute the majority of pediatric cases, the needs of these children also require attention and treatment, especially during the pandemic time.

From the start of the pandemic, we clearly saw that vaccination and nutrition programs were heavily impacted. At the same time, other basic non-medical services for children have also been affected: Access to education, protection against domestic violence, etc.

Health personnel is often relocated -when they have not stopped working because salaries are no longer paid- in order to meet the needs arising from the pandemic. In this type of humanitarian context, medical staff is already limited, so by diverting part of human resources to cover the response to COVID-19, the risk of not meeting basic needs in pediatric programs has increased.

What are the main recommendations made during this time of pandemic crisis to prevent the growth of infant morbidity and mortality?

Some very simple recommendations must be put in place, Fair Future is working in this direction!

First, it is necessary to maintain regular pediatric preventive and curative services. Some of the human, material, and strategic resources that usually exist for these prevention programs have been reduced and we will see the consequences in the near future. For example, we could soon see epidemic outbreaks because of children who have not been vaccinated against rubella or measles. By reducing or closing outpatient clinics, the number of diagnoses (eg diagnosis of malaria, severe dengue) has already increased in the regions where we work with Fair Future.

Children are not the face of covid-19 but will certainly not be spared

Second, we need to develop new approaches and implement the necessary practical tools on the ground. For example Nutrition programs, water supply, creation of community gardens, and development of local resources.

Finally, we must continue to defend the rights of children in this pandemic. They are not the ones who die from COVID-19 but will certainly be the ones who will be the most impacted.

Regardless of the negative impact the COVID-19 pandemic has and will have on children in the years to come, have there really been any positive externalities in the Foundation’s projects on the ground?

Community health care activities, which have become a key component in the fight against COVID-19, have reminded us of the effectiveness of this system and should continue to be strongly implemented and integrated into established outreach strategies. by Kawan Baik and Fair Future in more rural areas.

This extraordinary situation confirms that our medical but also logistical teams must be terribly flexible and innovative to provide logistical, social, medical or technical support that is adapted and as adequate as possible in the field.

What types of difficulties do we encounter in the field but also in hospitals in the outermost and rural regions linked to the health care provided to children?

Obviously, the lack of nutrition plays a terrible impact on the physical development of the child. As the parents no longer have any income, the condition of the children has greatly deteriorated, the food budget is being severely impacted.

Pregnant women whom we must also talk about are struck by the pandemic, the lack of medical care, healthy food, drinking water during the time of their pregnancy. We have also observed that a significant number of young pregnant women were proportionately more affected by COVID-19 than the others. Without classifying them for all that in the category of “vulnerable people”, their condition requires a healthy diet, care, good hygiene. Conditions that are not met far from it here, for example in eastern Indonesia.

Fair Future Foundation – September 2021/aw

Donate for a cause of your choice

Donate to programs initiated by Fair Future and be on the ground with us. We are committed to ensuring that as many people as possible have access to medical care (basic and emergency care), Covid-19 screening and testing, access to school and knowledge, drinking and clean water, sanitation, women's rights, and minorities living in rural and ultra peripheral areas.

Going where no one ever goes is one of our priorities, see Truck Of Life program.

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Donate for Clean Water Access in East Sumba

Do you want to participate in the drilling of a well for 40 families and 250 people? Provide clean and potable water to all those who no longer have access to it, or who have never had access to it. Water is life, water makes you feel good!

To do this, Fair Future and the Indonesian Red Cross are launching a program to build wells, toilets and provide access to drinking water to 42 villages and communities in East Sumba.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for healthcare, to improve health and save lives

Whether it is to fight against famine, diseases linked to the lack of clean water, the lack of sanitation system, the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, respiratory diseases linked to air pollution, tuberculosis, or any other form of recurrent illness, Fair Future does what it can to best help populations in need.

Help us to provide us with medicines, medical equipment, logistics, my indispensable faith also to get us where no one ever goes. Help us to heal, to give a better life, to help us to save lives!

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COVID-19 in Indonesia, a dramatic situation

Take care of people, do what the state does not! Fair Futur acts to detect, test, treat and vaccinate the victims of the Pandemic. No Antigen tests, no vaccine (here in Sumba for example, hardly anyone is vaccinated). Also, the health centers are closed because they are infected and the medical staff is sick.

There are very few doctors and other medical personnel who are still at work. This is linked to medical and infectious factors, but also and above all because the staff is no longer paid, therefore they no longer come to work.

**Click here to make a donation

Donate for East Indonesia disaster

After the Sumba natural disaster in April 2021, Fair Future is the only foreign organization there. We commit ourselves every day to rebuild, to improve...

We are confronted with health problems, social challenges. We need infrastructural and human resources. They need to eat, drink, have access to healthcare and a roof to protect themselves!

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The Fair Future donation platform focuses on the fundraising needs of nonprofit organizations

More than yesterday and even less than tomorrow, Fair Future and Kawan Baik Foundations continue to develop projects with humanitarian, positive, and virtuous objectives.

Our organizations get involved every day, in a concrete way on the ground. They are men and women, mostly volunteers, who work to find solutions and implement them so that everyone can have a better life.

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Sometimes, it is not possible to make a donation via modern solutions, by what is called "e-banking".

From then on, you can participate in one of our projects or programs by making a bank transfer, via one of our two bank accounts in Switzerland.

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Some more Information

Water Connections Project – The Full Presentation

The .PDF presentation of the current project “Water Connections” – Drinking water for 200 families in MbinuDita. This document presents to you in detail the project that we started at the beginning of November, after months of preliminary studies. Once completed, the water connections will reach homes, families throughout the MbinuDita region. A magic trick carried out thanks to all of you, to all the friends of the Foundation. the “Kawan Baik” from here and elsewhere. No water, no life. No blue, no green.

Water Connections project – Today, we started drilling in MbinuDita

From the drilling site, here in East Sumba, MbinuDita village. A very rural and isolated region, in which nearly 220 families live, economically poor, without access to water, electricity, sanitation solutions (WC, shower), or medical care. A region where the lack of water is wreaking havoc in terms of health. Our are therefore able to provide them with what they need most. Clean water to live, to drink, to have good health, to prosper economically too. These few photos were taken during the last 15 days during our mission to prepare the village for the arrival of a source of clean water, via the drilling of a deep well – more than 60 meters -. This action is fully linked to the “Water Connections” program, initiated by Fair Future and Kawan Baik Indonesia foundations. A complicated project but which will come to fruition after two weeks of work on the spot, or about 15 days to drill, there … In the middle of nowhere, at the bottom of the hill that hosts our school in SD Mbinudita.

Medical assistance – Malaria in Indonesia, what we are doing?

Risk is present throughout the country, excluding urban areas, and excluding the areas specified: J akarta, Surabaya, Denpasar (Bali), and other large cities are risk-free, including the beach resorts in southern Bali. Sporadic cases of malaria in travelers have been reported from rural areas of Java, Bali (Padangbai area), Bintan, and Lombok islands. The WHO data does not take into account the situation in eastern Indonesia, which is linked to the lack of existing data. Nevertheless, malaria in the regions of Flores, Sumba Timur and Kupang is important in rural villages.

Rumah Kambera, the last few months on the site!

Rumah Kambera, some pictures taken during the last 6 weeks. A job 18 hours a day, 7 days a week in order to give the best of ourselves to all those who have great needs in the regions of eastern Indonesia. The foundation develops and implements actions in eastern Indonesia (NTT) and notably in East Sumba. To do so, we decided to coordinate our actions from what is now; “The Fair Future Base Camp” in the eastern regions of the country. In a village near Waingapu called Lambanapu. Rumah Kambera is its name. This -house- is a place of coordination of all our socio-medical, educational activities in favor of children, women, and communities in rural and peripheral regions where access to water, electricity, education, or healthcare is almost non-existent.

Dengue fever cases still on the rise despite seasonal change

The COVID-19 epidemic has not slowed the onset of seasonal dengue fever across the country. The country has been battling dengue fever since early this year, at a time when state resources have been spent on curbing the COVID-19 outbreak. The similarities between dengue fever and COVID-19 symptoms have also complicated efforts to mitigate the annual spike in cases. The island of Java has contributed the highest average number of dengue hemorrhagic fever cases each year. In recent years, Bali and Borneo (Kalimantan) have had the highest incidence.

Order the Fair Future Foundation T-Shirt now!

To support the actions of the foundation, you can help us in several ways. You can buy one of our t-shirts for example! The Fair Future team in the field uses this new 2021 t-shirt. Pure White and simple, it uses the colors of Switzerland, Indonesia, and of course, our official logo. The Red and the White: Association of two colors which represent Passion and Purity!

Impact of air pollution on health in Indonesia!

Outdoor air pollution is a mix of chemicals, particulate matter, and biological materials that react with each other to form tiny hazardous particles. It contributes to breathing problems, chronic diseases, increased hospitalization, and premature mortality. In Indonesia, this is the cause 50% of morbidity nationwide. How is air pollution affecting Indonesia? More than 80% of the Indonesian population of more than 260 million inhabitants, is exposed to annual average concentrations of pollution, well above the WHO guideline. The country has the fifth-highest loss of years of life in the world due to particulate matter pollution.

Assistance to people in case of malnutrition problems

Social consequences of malnutrition. Undernourished children have weaker immune systems and are thus more susceptible to infections and illnesses. Long-term insufficient nutrient intake and frequent infections can cause stunting, whose effects in terms of delayed motor and cognitive development are largely irreversible.

Medical Assistance for Children’s in pandemic time

Fair Future notes that children are certainly the most affected by the indirect impact of the pandemic than by the viral infection itself. Indeed, we have noticed that the COVID-19 pandemic is having an impact on the health of children, but through the increase in poverty, the loss of education and the closure of schools -here in Indonesia the closure of schools since March 2020-, food insecurity, violence as well as increased pressure on health systems and reduced access to personal health care services.

Rumah Kambera Base Camp – Covid-19 fight and Clean Water updates

Management of the pharmacy, water supply, Covid-19 program, infrastructures, and day-to-day organizations.
Facing the crisis linked to the pandemic, the lack of water and vital resources, managing the organizational structure in order to optimize the social and medical assistance that we offer. The 24 hours that a day counts are not enough to do everything!

Common diseases we work on

Life-saving tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

A social disease, tuberculosis affects more particularly the poorest groups of the population, in particular the homeless people in whom the incidence (approximately 200 / 100,000) far exceeds that of other groups.

In Indonesia, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in the category of infectious diseases. However, when one considers the general causes of death, tuberculosis ranks 3rd after heart disease and acute respiratory disease at all ages. The number of tuberculosis cases found in 2019 was around 645,000 cases. This figure has increased from the tuberculosis data recorded in 2018, which was in the order of 566.00 cases.

Meanwhile, the number of recorded deaths from tuberculosis based on WHO 2019 data is 98,000 people. This includes 5,300 deaths of tuberculosis patients with HIV / AIDS.

Life-saving anti-tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

In 2020, the 30 countries with a high TB burden accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two-thirds of the total, led by India, followed by Indonesia, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and South Africa.


More info: https://tbindonesia.or.id/pustaka-tbc/informasi/tentang-tbc/situasi-tbc-di-indonesia-2/

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

A social disease, tuberculosis affects more particularly the poorest groups of the population, in particular the homeless people in whom the incidence (approximately 200 / 100,000) far exceeds that of other groups.

In Indonesia, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in the category of infectious diseases. However, when one considers the general causes of death, tuberculosis ranks 3rd after heart disease and acute respiratory disease at all ages. The number of tuberculosis cases found in 2019 was around 645,000 cases. This figure has increased from the tuberculosis data recorded in 2018, which was in the order of 566.00 cases.

Meanwhile, the number of recorded deaths from tuberculosis based on WHO 2019 data is 98,000 people. This includes 5,300 deaths of tuberculosis patients with HIV / AIDS.

Life-saving anti-tuberculosis drugs are still unaffordable and out of reach for children in high-burden countries like Indonesia.

In 2020, the 30 countries with a high TB burden accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two-thirds of the total, led by India, followed by Indonesia, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, and South Africa.


More info: https://tbindonesia.or.id/pustaka-tbc/informasi/tentang-tbc/situasi-tbc-di-indonesia-2/

Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major cause of acute febrile illness in Indonesia.  And a high cause of death.

Dengue Fever

Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by dengue virus infection (IVD) which is transmitted through the bite of the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Dengue virus infection is an endemic disease that appears throughout the year, especially in the rainy season in various tropical and sub-tropical regions including in Indonesia. The rainy season is an optimal condition for breeding mosquitoes, so there can be an increase in cases that are high and fast. According to WHO, Indonesia is the second-largest country with dengue cases among 30 endemic regions.

Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children, and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and unplanned rapid urbanisation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is putting enormous pressure on the health and management systems of Dengue and tens of thousands of cases have not been managed properly, increasing mortality from this viral disease. Fair Future deals a lot with cases of Dengue, especially in poor villages, where no waste management is in place.

The case fatality rate (CFR) has been estimated at more than 20% of those infected. Knowing that Dengue fever affects millions of people every year, this makes it one of the most important causes of death in Indonesia. Complications can lead to circulatory system failure and shock, and can be fatal (also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome).

In some cases, Dengue infection is asymptomatic – persons do not exhibit symptoms. Those with symptoms get ill between 4 to 7 days after the bite. The infection is characterised by flu-like symptoms which include a sudden high fever coming in separate waves, pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint, and bone pain, severe headache, and a skin rash with red spots. Treatment includes supportive care of symptoms.

There is no antiviral treatment available. The illness may progress to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, bruising, and uncontrolled bleeding.

...

--> Read the dedicated page about Dengue Fever


More information: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/dengue-fever-cases-still-on-the-rise-despite-seasonal-change/

Dengue Fever

Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by dengue virus infection (IVD) which is transmitted through the bite of the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Dengue virus infection is an endemic disease that appears throughout the year, especially in the rainy season in various tropical and sub-tropical regions including in Indonesia. The rainy season is an optimal condition for breeding mosquitoes, so there can be an increase in cases that are high and fast. According to WHO, Indonesia is the second-largest country with dengue cases among 30 endemic regions.

Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children, and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and unplanned rapid urbanisation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is putting enormous pressure on the health and management systems of Dengue and tens of thousands of cases have not been managed properly, increasing mortality from this viral disease. Fair Future deals a lot with cases of Dengue, especially in poor villages, where no waste management is in place.

The case fatality rate (CFR) has been estimated at more than 20% of those infected. Knowing that Dengue fever affects millions of people every year, this makes it one of the most important causes of death in Indonesia. Complications can lead to circulatory system failure and shock, and can be fatal (also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome).

In some cases, Dengue infection is asymptomatic – persons do not exhibit symptoms. Those with symptoms get ill between 4 to 7 days after the bite. The infection is characterised by flu-like symptoms which include a sudden high fever coming in separate waves, pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint, and bone pain, severe headache, and a skin rash with red spots. Treatment includes supportive care of symptoms.

There is no antiviral treatment available. The illness may progress to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, bruising, and uncontrolled bleeding.

...

--> Read the dedicated page about Dengue Fever


More information: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/dengue-fever-cases-still-on-the-rise-despite-seasonal-change/

Each year, malaria kills thousands of people in Indonesia. 70% of all deaths are children under five years of age.

Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that spreads when an infected mosquito, bites a person. The mosquito transfers parasites into that person’s bloodstream. Symptoms of malaria include fever and shaking chills. Malaria is common in tropical countries such as Africa and Asia. Malaria is treatable if it’s caught early. The malaria trend in Indonesia is increasing dramatically in recent years. The disease is fairly easy to treat, but access to the most effective treatments remains insufficient. 

90% of all malaria deaths occur due to a lack of access to medical care. Mosquito nets are expensive and out of reach for many.

  • Malaria risk is present below the altitude of 2000 meters
  • High-risk months for Malaria are: January to December

The transmission of COVID-19 in Indonesia has continued unabated and has spread to malaria-endemic areas, in particular the eastern provinces of the country, such as East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) where Fair Future is working, Maluku, and Papua, forcing authorities to intensify their vigilance to avoid a double burden of disease.

According to data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health, an estimated 250,644 cases of malaria have occurred in Indonesia, 85% of which are in rural areas. The high level of malaria endemicity in some areas is a cause for concern, not least because there is no end in sight for the COVID-19 crisis. This figure should nevertheless be taken in the conditional because in a large number of regions of the country, people do not have an identity card or family record book, or people do not have access to medical care.

Plasmodium - a parasite that causes malaria in humans - can damage the immune system, which is why patients with malaria are prone to other infections, including COVID-19.

And there are no new drugs in the development pipeline, which means we may find ourselves without effective options in the future.

Read the full dedicated page here! It's really interesting.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-malaria-in-indonesia-what-we-are-doing/

Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that spreads when an infected mosquito, bites a person. The mosquito transfers parasites into that person’s bloodstream. Symptoms of malaria include fever and shaking chills. Malaria is common in tropical countries such as Africa and Asia. Malaria is treatable if it’s caught early. The malaria trend in Indonesia is increasing dramatically in recent years. The disease is fairly easy to treat, but access to the most effective treatments remains insufficient. 

90% of all malaria deaths occur due to a lack of access to medical care. Mosquito nets are expensive and out of reach for many.

  • Malaria risk is present below the altitude of 2000 meters
  • High-risk months for Malaria are: January to December

The transmission of COVID-19 in Indonesia has continued unabated and has spread to malaria-endemic areas, in particular the eastern provinces of the country, such as East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) where Fair Future is working, Maluku, and Papua, forcing authorities to intensify their vigilance to avoid a double burden of disease.

According to data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health, an estimated 250,644 cases of malaria have occurred in Indonesia, 85% of which are in rural areas. The high level of malaria endemicity in some areas is a cause for concern, not least because there is no end in sight for the COVID-19 crisis. This figure should nevertheless be taken in the conditional because in a large number of regions of the country, people do not have an identity card or family record book, or people do not have access to medical care.

Plasmodium - a parasite that causes malaria in humans - can damage the immune system, which is why patients with malaria are prone to other infections, including COVID-19.

And there are no new drugs in the development pipeline, which means we may find ourselves without effective options in the future.

Read the full dedicated page here! It's really interesting.


More info: https://fairfuturefoundation.org/medical-assistance-malaria-in-indonesia-what-we-are-doing/

A real health emergency, resistance to antimicrobials. It threatens to make simple cuts & easily treatable diseases, are deadly again.

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial agents have played a vital role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases around the world. The WHO South-East Asia Region is no exception. On an Indonesian or "local" scale, antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, are very cheap, accessible, and very effective. It is with good reason that many have long considered them to be "miracle drugs".

The situation in Indonesia with this major health problem is absolutely catastrophic. Participating physicians prescribe antimicrobials on all counts, for infections for which any form of antimicrobial is unnecessary. Too large a proportion of sick patients simply no longer respond to the treatments they - sometimes very urgently - need.

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates “superbugs” that make treatment of basic infections difficult (and in some cases impossible) and surgery risky. And while the emergence of resistance in microorganisms is an ongoing phenomenon, its amplification and spread are the results of one thing: human behavior.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is particularly affected. As the risk assessments conducted by WHO have shown, the Region is probably the most at-risk part of the world. Not only does AMR affect the health and well-being of people in Indonesia, it also has ramifications for public health and general well-being. This makes the problem of immense global importance.

 


More info: https://www.balimedicaljournal.org/index.php/bmj/article/viewFile/1386/pdf

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial agents have played a vital role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases around the world. The WHO South-East Asia Region is no exception. On an Indonesian or "local" scale, antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, are very cheap, accessible, and very effective. It is with good reason that many have long considered them to be "miracle drugs".

The situation in Indonesia with this major health problem is absolutely catastrophic. Participating physicians prescribe antimicrobials on all counts, for infections for which any form of antimicrobial is unnecessary. Too large a proportion of sick patients simply no longer respond to the treatments they - sometimes very urgently - need.

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates “superbugs” that make treatment of basic infections difficult (and in some cases impossible) and surgery risky. And while the emergence of resistance in microorganisms is an ongoing phenomenon, its amplification and spread are the results of one thing: human behavior.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is particularly affected. As the risk assessments conducted by WHO have shown, the Region is probably the most at-risk part of the world. Not only does AMR affect the health and well-being of people in Indonesia, it also has ramifications for public health and general well-being. This makes the problem of immense global importance.

 


More info: https://www.balimedicaljournal.org/index.php/bmj/article/viewFile/1386/pdf
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Fair Future Foundation

Fair Future Foundation

The Fair Future Foundation is a Swiss Foundation recognized of Pure Public Utility & State Approved by the Canton of Vaud and the Swiss Confederation.

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The Fair Future Foundation and the Kawan Baik Indonesia foundations, are looking for you Kawan! We need you to be part of the communication team of the Fair Future Foundation and the Kawan Baik Indonesia non-profit organisation, based in Indonesia.

You've got excellent writing and editing skills in English, you're good in project management skills, including time management, goal-setting, multitasking and prioritization, you have a huge motivation and extraordinary sense of communication, business correspondence, public relations, advertising, marketing and sales copy and social media and a large sense of humour?

You're not afraid to impose yourself? You have an atypical personality and a great sense of humanity?

Do you have a good experience in the world of non-profit organizations?

If yes, it means you're ready to be a part of the change, and that you are the one we are delighted to meet!

📝Apply now here and... 👋See you soon!

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No water, no life. No blue, no green - Water Connections Project!

The project in images and .PDF version. You can read it and help us help them access a source of 💦clean water, in quantity and quality, by 🇨🇭Fair Future Foundation and 🇮🇩Kawan Baik Indonesia.

Thank you for your time, your interest and benevolence.

#SwissNGO #Water #WaterConnections #CleanWaterAccess #FairFutureFoundation #KawanBaikIndonesia #NTT #Indonesia #Switzerland #HealthierLife #Malnutrition #Donate #DonateForCleanWater

fairfuturefoundation.org/water-connections-project-the-full-presentation/
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No water, no life. No blue, no green - Water Connections Project!

The project in images and .PDF version. You can read it and help us help them access a source of 💦clean water, in quantity and quality, by 🇨🇭Fair Future Foundation and 🇮🇩Kawan Baik Indonesia.

Thank you for your time, your interest and benevolence.

#SwissNGO #Water #WaterConnections #CleanWaterAccess #FairFutureFoundation #KawanBaikIndonesia #NTT #Indonesia #Switzerland #HealthierLife #Malnutrition #Donate #DonateForCleanWater

https://fairfuturefoundation.org/water-connections-project-the-full-presentation/

A project such as drilling a well to a depth of more than 60m, in the middle of nowhere, in an area where no one has access to 💦water, is a challenge that requires working with the local community!

Due to these few 15 days of preparation, we had to go to the site every day, tackle the roads that are not, remember to bring all the equipment, organise, demonstrate great adaptability and resistance to Fatigue, climate, lack of sleep. But what immense happiness today! This is the ultimate reward, the joy of seeing the smiles on the faces of these villagers: They are going to have water very soon!

These few images show the work we carried out during the 15 days preceding the start of the drilling, which began yesterday November 08, 2021. A project leaded by 🇨🇭Fair Future Foundation and 🇮🇩Kawan Baik Indonesia from the field in East Sumba.

Those last few 15 day, an access had to be opened in order to transport the equipment on site, certainly more than a ton of material and drilling equipment. Nearly 1500m across virgin fields, tall grass, land, and dealing with the ⛰️relief of the land. Note that no vehicle had previously entered the site of this drilling and it took us an hour to arrive at the site we had chosen last month. An immense feeling of having arrived in a sort of "promised land", where water will soon ⛲spring up!

It was also necessary to build a 🏕️place so that the drillers can spend about 15 days on the site, including sleeping, eating, washing, cooking... But also finding solutions to bring and store the nearly 💧20'000 litres of water it takes to drill a well over 60 meters deep.

In this community live more than 200 families who do not have access to 🚰water or sanitation solutions. Therefore the enthusiasm is formidable, a surge of solidarity is triggered spontaneously, and the help of these poor families in terms of economy, is very touching.

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Our fight against the Covid-19 pandemic in NTT

Indonesia is one of the countries most affected in the world

Fair Future and Kawan Baik as you know have a center in Sumba East, in which our teams are active every day: volunteers, doctors, nursing staff. Rumah Kambera, our Base Camp on-site for the territories of eastern Indonesia, with the "Truck of Life" program that we recently launched, is able to carry out screening campaigns, Antigen or PCR tests, and of course, participate in the common effort of vaccination for all.

Tests, Vaccines, careActo with us to fight the pandemic

How your donations are used?Your donations pay for tons of food, medical treatments, solutions to have a better and healthier life!Thank you very much for your support

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Your donationMatters a lot to them!Your gift will help us provide solutions for an healthier life, to all thos in need

How your donationsAre used?Your gifts provide medical care, life-saving resources, to tens of thousands of people

The key to anHealthy living is to Simply being with people, understanding them and helping them according to their real needs