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A traditional well in an ultra-rural area of East Sumba

A traditional well in an ultra-rural area of East Sumba

 

This "picture of the day" shows you how families manage to have water at home for eating, drinking, bathing, taking care of children, watering livestock and animals, and watering gardens.

The vast majority of villages in this region, where Fair Future and Kawan Baik have been operating for so many years, do not have access to clean water, among other things! This well, dug by hand by the villagers themselves, is about 15 meters deep.

Most of the time, it is dry, or when it has water, it is of a colour that does not encourage consumption. It can be brown, beige, or chocolate, even with a little "consistency, thick" when there is little water in the well: This is because of a mixture of soil, sediments, bacteria and others microbes which reproduce there favourably. Or, it can be really white because the level of limestone is too high. In all cases, and of all colours, this water is bad and, in the medium term, dangerous for the health of families.

Teachers in rural villages heal and save lives!

Teachers in rural villages heal and save lives!

The magic of this "Primary Medica Care" program? It's just that it's unique in the world and it works. The first promotion of about sixty teachers who have followed the training in primary medical care in rural areas, tells us about their "exploits" and their work as first aiders. They gain self-confidence, that's the most important thing, and we note it.

The teachers, in their village and thanks to the knowledge and medical care equipment they acquired during the courses last December, provide medical care for injured or sick children. Medical care is provided and lives are saved.

Read more information here kawan.

Teachers in rural villages heal and save lives!

Teachers provide primary medical care

The magic of this "Primary Medica Care" program? It's just that it's unique in the world and it works. The first batch of sixty teachers who have followed the training in primary medical care in rural areas, tell us about their "exploits" and their work as rescuers. They take confidence in themselves it is the most important, and we note it. Medical care is given to children of sick or injured adults. Lives are being saved.

Having water allows them to drink and eat, to live better

Having water allows them to drink and eat, to live better

 

This "Picture of the Day" shows you a person watering their garden in order to grow their own vegetables for the family at home.

The Water Connections program works wonderfully, water makes things possible here in East Sumba, and that's what it's all about. Clean water at home for eating, drinking and having a healthy life.

For months, Fair Future and Kawan Baik Indonesia foundations have seen a fundamental change in the habits of families who benefit from the "Water Connections" program. Gardens are created, mainy gardens actually. People eat better, drink more, have more energy and are less sick. This observation fills us with joy and comforts us in our choices and decisions. Access to better health has always been the foundation's primary mission, and healing people by giving them water is incredible.

Gardens appear in front of the small houses of wood, earth and bamboo, on the site of our school and everywhere in the village, near one of the thirty water tanks we have built. Previously, water for watering gardens was not a family's priority, with only a few litres a day available for everything. Consequently, new activities are created, and new opportunities arise. Families are gradually being rebuilt. They acquire a healthier life, and they are much healthier too.

Water Connections This is the name of this vast program managed by the Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations. It gives access to clean water and healthy toilets to the rural populations of Indonesia.

New sanitary facilities for a healthier life

New sanitary facilities for a healthier life

 

This "Picture of the Day" shows you the healthy sanitation facilities we are building here in East Sumba. Having provided access to drinking water – through the Water Connections program – to these 270 families in Mbinudita, East Sumba also offers the possibility of having toilets for the first time in these villages. And it was unimaginable a few months ago for these families living in rural areas.

Can you imagine what the health consequences are for these hundreds, these thousands of families who defecate behind a tree or the house? In a hole and having no water to flush the place? We see it every day here. Sick children suffering from diarrhoea are the daily life of our medical teams.

The Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations have made more than 20 sanitary fixtures, many of which look like this. Clean and hygienic, with water to rinse them off after use, showers to wash up, and safety tanks to collect wastewater. And now families have a healthier life. People are less sick, children suffer less from diarrhoea, and infant mortality is decreasing and will continue to decline.

Water Connections This vast program is supported by the Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations. It provides access to drinking water and clean toilets to rural populations in Indonesia.

HDPE pipe rolls that we use to create the Water Connections.

HDPE pipe rolls that we use to create the Water Connections.

In this "Picture of the Day", taken at the end of last December, our on-site teams are busily unrolling a 250m roll of HDPE pipe. The children of the village of Mbinudita gather at the pipes to drink fresh, clean and healthy water which flows there. This is the first time in their lives that they drink water of this quality from a pipe.

From the three deep boreholes we have drilled, we are connecting over 30 water tanks, over 20 sanitation facilities and all numerous other infrastructures that Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations have built over the past 20 months in East Sumba. Each water tank has a capacity of between 7500 and 3500 litres of clean and safe water. Each bathroom has two toilets, showers, water point for washing clothes.

These Water Connections – from the name of this vast program managed by the Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations and which provide access to clean water to the rural water populations of Indonesia – are made thanks to these enormous rolls of pipes HDPE thermoplastics. To date, it's more than ten kilometres of HDEP pipes that all of us here have pulled, buried, connected and powered to provide access to drinking water to more than 2700 people here in #Mbinudita.

Clean water in the house for the first time

Clean water in the house for the first time

Last December, while we were on site here in the village of Mbinudita, the Fair Future and Kawan Baik teams linked several infrastructures built for and around the Water Connections project by means of + /- 4000 meters of PVC HDPE pipes which we have now buried.

In doing so, we entered a significant number of houses, and for the first time in the history of these families, they had running water directly in the kitchens. You had to hear the cries of joy, the laughter too. And tears of joy for these families who suddenly have access to a source of clean water at home. Water connections create a clean and safe water network for families from rural areas in eastern Indonesia.

This image of the day shows you one of those very emotional moments, during which our teams entered one of the houses with a 1-inch pipe to connect it from the second deep borehole to the reservoir which is there and that we have built.

Women, children and water at home

Women, children and water at home

Indonesian women play a vital role in water management due to their traditional responsibilities of collecting water, cooking, cleaning and raising children. These women from these ultra-rural areas of eastern Indonesia are strong. They represent tremendously well the strength and the courage it takes to survive here in this vast country. To fend for themselves most of the time, without the help of others, to meet the family’s most basic needs. Therefore, empowering women to increase water security is essential in the regions where we work. With climate change affecting water sources, it is vital to ensure that women are involved in water management decisions. This allows (we see this every day) families and local communities to improve their incomes and the health of family members, including their children.