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Preamble and short information: With their words, their voices, in their using their own languages. As part of our fieldwork, our two foundations meet thousands of people from the most difficult regions of Indonesia. People tell us about their lives, their wounds, their difficulties, their joys and their sorrows, and their work. The lack of everything sometimes. The lack of food, water, medical care, state aid and so many other issues that our two organizations try to respond to every day. All audio recordings were made by Kawan Baik Indonesia, Fair Future and their teams on the ground. Testimonials, project feasibility studies, specific case studies, internal podcasts but made available to everyone, the study of a particular case, a particular life story, or a medical case for which we all together want to find a solution. Thank you for your attention.
Pepuatu | Two adults tell us about their living conditions

Pepuatu | Two adults tell us about their living conditions

From the village of Pepuatu, two adults tell us about their living conditions, the difficulties in eating, washing, drinking and getting basic medical care. He’s the village chief, and she’s an active person in the village, but she’s been sick for years. U Parkinson’s disease certainly, given the tremors on his face. They tell us that many children are undernourished, which we have seen during the day here. It is a rich and touching testimony in our opinion.

Pepuatu | Darma 10yo tells us about his life

Pepuatu | Darma 10yo tells us about his life

Little Darma tells us about his life as a ten-year-old child, his problems also sitting in the grass, in front of a wooden house. He speaks to us from the village of Pepuatu, very isolated and very difficult to access. Darma, 10 years old, tells us about her life in her village, which is isolated from a lot of things. When we ask him if he is in good health, he replies that no, he is sick. What are the kid’s dreams? To have water, electricity and a road to access his village. A touching testimony of this child is Sumba East. He tells us about the hardness of his life, of his dreams too. He cannot walk too much, because he is not in very good health, and the appropriate medical care is not accessible, the village chief will tell us later.

Pepuatu | Herman, 17, tells us about his life in his remote village

Pepuatu | Herman, 17, tells us about his life in his remote village

From East Sumba, with frankness, sincerity and great maturity. What are Herman’s dreams? Have water, electricity and a road to access his village. A touching testimony from this young adult. He tells us about the hardness of his life, of his dreams too. How much time per day does he spend fetching water or food from the forest? His life at school too because he has to walk a long way to reach the main road.

Mbinudita | Pak Awang talks about his everyday struggles

Mbinudita | Pak Awang talks about his everyday struggles

Pak Awang is Marapu, one of the foundation’s very good friends and an outstanding worker. Aged 55, Pak Awang is happy to have a new water tank for his family, made up of 19 people living in 3 small wooden and bamboo houses at the top of one of the hills in the region. He and his family have no money and are struggling to eat every day. He only has two goats left and no more rice, no more corn. It is a poignant testimony, touching in more than one way because it teaches us that we still have to do more to be able to further improve the living conditions of people living in ultra-rural areas of East Sumba, the poorest of the regions of Indonesia.

Mbinudita | Pak Kaur and his wife talk about their life

Mbinudita | Pak Kaur and his wife talk about their life

Mbinudita | Pak Kaur and his wife explain to us their living situation related to the lack of water. Their life is simple but so complicated! Like all the other families, that of Bapak Kaur works in the fields, they are farmers. Pak Kaur and his wife tell us about their dream of having clean water here, close to home. Water to grow a garden, eat better, take a shower, and wash. But above all to be able to drink more, cook more. Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations built a 6,500 litres reservoir in front of their house to (temporarily) collect rainwater, once the dry season is over. The drilling of a deep well close to their home would allow them to have access to clean water in quantity and quality. You can help them achieve this dream!

Laindatang | Survey, a life without water, food, electricity

Laindatang | Survey, a life without water, food, electricity

Mbatakapidu – Laindatang | Following a direct request from the authorities and the government of East Sumba, we were asked to help a very isolated village without any access worthy of the name. The inhabitants, numbering 35 families, do not have access to water, electricity or medical care. The nearest water point is located more than three kilometres away, and when it is dry (about eight months a year), nearly ten kilometres from the nearest dwellings. We went there with the Truck Of Life, following the profile of the hills, hazardous paths on which sometimes we had much trouble moving forward. For nearly three hours, we had little to talk with the villagers to discuss the daily lives of impoverished and disadvantaged families. Together, we took stock of the existing situation: They only have rainwater, which they consume daily. They recover it thanks to ingenious systems which demonstrate their infinite distress. They store this water in a few hand-built reservoirs. People are sick and poor. They eat little and wash only a few times a month.

Lukukamaru | A village without water, electricity, food

Lukukamaru | A village without water, electricity, food

Access is difficult in this very isolated rural village. No road or path leads there. We spend several hours with the villagers to better understand their problems in life, their health, and how they live with almost nothing. We ask them the right questions & share looks, smiles, and tears too for some. No water, no income, can only shower once a week at most, eat only boiled corn, a little rice when they can buy it, salt, and peppers. For the rest, they get it from the forest, nature, roots and wild green vegetables. Consequences of this life: Fatigue, various diseases, malnutrition, water stress, especially psychological. It should also be noted that the pests have completely destroyed the corn crops, and the gardens and this is additional anguish. We have been planning for months to do something for this village, as for the others. A borehole, a well, a Ferro-cement tank. This would guarantee them 100% better health, a healthier life, in harmony with their environment too.

Lewa | Invasion of pests as East Sumba, with Koramil-Babinsa

Lewa | Invasion of pests as East Sumba, with Koramil-Babinsa

For three years this scourge involving families and millions of grasshoppers has returned regularly with each harvest. During high population years, they feed and severely damage almost all crops, trees, shrubs and vegetable gardens. Acres are destroyed in minutes; nothing is left! The impact is enormous for these poor families since their income is not enough to buy additional food and other plants. Fear and stress drive people to meaningless actions…