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Primary medical care for kids in rural areas

Primary medical care for kids in rural areas

The inhabitants of rural villages do not have access to primary care, and most medical centres are often several hours away on foot. The harshness of life here means we often get hurt, but nothing is available to treat ourselves—no doctor, knowledge, medical equipment and, of course, no antiseptic or medicine. These injuries can lead to the death of a child or an adult if they get worse. We must therefore act quickly. Fair Future, for years, has empowered schools and families in ultra-rural communities to take action in the event of an accident. Today, we are taking another step in this program.

Shortage of clean, safe drinking water

Shortage of clean, safe drinking water

All these people, we meet every day. When we ask them what their biggest dream is, all without exception answer us this: To have clean water, some not dangerous for their health and that of children, and pregnant women. To have access to it here, close to home. To be able to water and cultivate a garden, eat better, shower, and wash. But above all to be able to drink more, cook more. The Fair Future and Kawan Baik foundations within the framework of the Water Connections project, strive by all means to fulfil their dreams. Their lives, their health and their future are at stake. Water is the source of life, of all life!

Days of medical care in rural areas

Days of medical care in rural areas

Discover the different contexts and situations in which Fair Future teams intervene to provide care, including crisis and natural disaster situations, and how and why we adapt our activities to each. Days of care like the one we present to you below we do dozens of them a year and they are adapted to people from rural areas, who for the most part have never seen a doctor before us.

Antimicrobial resistances. What happens when drugs stop working?

Antimicrobial resistances. What happens when drugs stop working?

Bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other microbes are constantly changing to ensure their survival, we have seen this with variants of influenza, COVID-10, etc. Some have adapted so well to medical treatment that the drugs commonly used for preventing or killing them are no longer effective. These microbes cause drug-resistant infections. Their ability to survive the drugs used against them is called antimicrobial resistance (AMR). In the case of bacterial pathogens, for which antibiotics are the most common and important drugs available for treatment, this is called antibiotic resistance (ABR). We mustn’t wait until it’s too late to tackle this major health challenge.

Water is when we don’t have it that we realise how important it is!

Water is when we don’t have it that we realise how important it is!

Water we do not realize how important it is when we have access to it like that, by opening a simple tap and sometimes forgetting to close it. Water is when we don’t have it that we realize how important it is, how vital it is for our everyday life. So for a moment, let’s try to imagine what our life could be like without water. And if we have access to it, that this water is not consumable! This is what the families experience here, the children of all these villages in which Fair Future works almost 24 hours a day. The health of people, the prevention of diseases, the reduction of infant mortality, offering a better quality of life, food every day, a shower every day and for everyone are just a few aspects that oblige us to work and develop. innovative and sustainable solutions, relating to access to water in quantity and quality for families in the poorest and rural regions.

Tuberculosis incidence in Indonesia in relation to the COVID pandemic!

Tuberculosis incidence in Indonesia in relation to the COVID pandemic!

The annual risk of TB infection in Southeast Asia is 1-2.5%, representing an upward trend for the region. In Indonesia, there are roughly 500,000 new cases of TB annually and 175,000 attributable deaths. Tuberculosis is the second major killer of adults after cardiovascular disease and the deadliest pathogen out of all communicable diseases. In global terms, there are one billion people infected with tuberculosis at any one time. Eight million new cases are reported annually with three million attributable deaths. However, despite these grim figures and without the influence of consistent treatment and immunization, its incidence is not as high as it was in the 20th century. The problem now is that with inadequate and inconsistent treatment regimes, a pool of persistent sputum-positive cases is being created!

Medical assistance – Malaria in Indonesia, what we are doing?

Medical assistance – Malaria in Indonesia, what we are doing?

Risk is present throughout the country, excluding urban areas, and excluding the areas specified: J akarta, Surabaya, Denpasar (Bali), and other large cities are risk-free, including the beach resorts in southern Bali. Sporadic cases of malaria in travelers have been reported from rural areas of Java, Bali (Padangbai area), Bintan, and Lombok islands. The WHO data does not take into account the situation in eastern Indonesia, which is linked to the lack of existing data. Nevertheless, malaria in the regions of Flores, Sumba Timur and Kupang is important in rural villages.

Dengue fever cases still on the rise despite the seasonal change

Dengue fever cases still on the rise despite the seasonal change

The COVID-19 epidemic has not slowed the onset of seasonal dengue fever across the country. The country has been battling dengue fever since early this year, at a time when state resources have been spent on curbing the COVID-19 outbreak. The similarities between dengue fever and COVID-19 symptoms have also complicated efforts to mitigate the annual spike in cases. The island of Java has contributed the highest average number of dengue hemorrhagic fever cases each year. In recent years, Bali and Borneo (Kalimantan) have had the highest incidence.